Making the case for active learning

By Dawn Hackman, M.S., AHIP, Research &Education Librarian University of North Dakota Library of the Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND On January 8, 2016 the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) hosted a workshop called “The Librarian and Active Learning Models,” which is available via the Medical Library Association’s Educational Clearinghouse. I worked with the SMHS’s Associate Dean for Teaching &Learning to identify a workshop on active learning that would be relevant to both librarians and faculty. We noticed that this workshop focused on three active learning methodologies that are common to medical education and might be effective at UND. (Incidentally, this workshop is being offered as CE at MLA’16 in Toronto…and I highly recommend it!) The co-instructors for the workshop are based out of the East Coast and so I knew the travel expenses would be considerable. To offset the cost to my library, I applied for (and received) a professional development grant through the GMR. This workshop wouldn’t have been possible without it. My target audience changed between my application and the actual event. Originally I planned on inviting only medical librarians and a handful of SMHS faculty to attend. I targeted medical librarians, because the methodologies were presented in the context of medical education in the class description. However, I soon realized that all UND librarians should be ...
Source: The Cornflower - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Funding General News from the Region Training Source Type: news

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As the new year approaches—potentially along with a new round of referrals—it’s a good time to prepare for new students who have yet to be identified for speech and language issues. Maybe it’s a new transfer student or a student receiving multi-tiered systems of support or one on a “watch” list. Handling new referrals involves one particularly sensitive task—planning those conversations with parents about their child. We must strike a careful balance of stating facts, giving our clinical opinion and remaining empathetic to the parent and their perspective. Explaining Language Skil...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Health Care Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Language Disorders Speech Disorders Source Type: blogs
Conclusions cWM mediates sentence comprehension in children with DLD and TD children. For TD children, comprehension occurs automatically through pattern recognition and linguistic chunking. For children with DLD, comprehension is cognitively effortful. Whereas canonical comprehension occurs through chunking, noncanonical comprehension develops on a word-by-word basis.Supplemental Materialhttps://doi.org/10.23641/asha.7178939
Source: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusion Higher-level language processes affect lower-level speech motor control processes, and this relationship appears to be more strongly mediated by language than speech skill.
Source: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusions Despite the groups' similar sentence comprehension abilities and ability to accurately respond to the information provided by the subject noun, children with DLD did not show sensitivity to number information on the fronted auxiliary. This insensitivity is considered in light of these children's weaker command of tense/agreement forms in their speech. Specifically, we consider the possibility that failure to grasp the relation between the subject –verb sequence (e.g.,dogs running) and preceding information (e.g.,are) in questions in the input contributes to the protracted inconsistency in producing auxili...
Source: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Interested in learning more about ongoing research on the nature, diagnosis and treatment of fluency disorders? Check out what SIG 4 has to offer affiliates! When did you join your SIG—and what made you want to join? I joined SIG 4 at its onset. I was a doctoral student specializing in stuttering and a professor thought it would be a good idea for me to join, and I have been a member ever since. One of the real highlights in the early days was the leadership conference. They set the standard for specialization and other important issues. How has your involvement with the SIG helped you in your career? I met le...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Academia & Research Health Care Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Fluency Disorders Speech Disorders stuttering Voice Disorders voice therapy Source Type: blogs
PMID: 30516313 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Int J Lang Commun Disord Source Type: research
Abstract Children and adolescents with developmental language disorder (DLD) are, overall, vulnerable to difficulties in emotional adjustment and in peer relations. However, previous research has shown that different subgroups follow different trajectories in respect to the quality of peer relations. Less is known about the trajectories of emotional development. We consider here the possibility that development in these two domains is interrelated: that is, the trajectories of emotional and peer problems will proceed in parallel. We conducted longitudinal joint trajectories analyses of emotional and peer relations in a s...
Source: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: In summary, 82.4% of the participants with 22q met criteria for 1 of 4 MSDs, predominantly speech motor delay and childhood dysarthria. Cross-validation of the present findings would support viewing MSDs as a core phenotypic feature of 22q. PMID: 30515510 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Am J Speech Lang Pathol Source Type: research
Conclusion: Higher-level language processes affect lower-level speech motor control processes, and this relationship appears to be more strongly mediated by language than speech skill. PMID: 30515517 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: J Speech Lang Hear Res Source Type: research
Source: The ASHA Leader Online - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
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