Making the case for active learning

By Dawn Hackman, M.S., AHIP, Research &Education Librarian University of North Dakota Library of the Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND On January 8, 2016 the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) hosted a workshop called “The Librarian and Active Learning Models,” which is available via the Medical Library Association’s Educational Clearinghouse. I worked with the SMHS’s Associate Dean for Teaching &Learning to identify a workshop on active learning that would be relevant to both librarians and faculty. We noticed that this workshop focused on three active learning methodologies that are common to medical education and might be effective at UND. (Incidentally, this workshop is being offered as CE at MLA’16 in Toronto…and I highly recommend it!) The co-instructors for the workshop are based out of the East Coast and so I knew the travel expenses would be considerable. To offset the cost to my library, I applied for (and received) a professional development grant through the GMR. This workshop wouldn’t have been possible without it. My target audience changed between my application and the actual event. Originally I planned on inviting only medical librarians and a handful of SMHS faculty to attend. I targeted medical librarians, because the methodologies were presented in the context of medical education in the class description. However, I soon realized that all UND librarians should be ...
Source: The Cornflower - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Funding General News from the Region Training Source Type: news

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By now, it’s pretty well established that just about everyone is using their smartphones, tablets and other popular technology devices a lot. And that this includes everyone from toddlers (and younger!) to adults. But what is all this screen time taking time away from, in the day-to-day lives of children? According to the results of a new national YouGov poll commissioned by ASHA and Read Aloud 15 MINUTES, released this week as summer officially begins . . . 43-percent of parents of children ages birth to 8 years said popular technology devices are a barrier/distraction to daily conversation and interaction between ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Advocacy News Slider Speech-Language Pathology Early Intervention Language Disorders Source Type: blogs
This study aims to detect the neural substrate underlying the language impairment in children with developmental language disorder (DLD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography. Deterministic DTI tractography was performed in a group of right-handed children with DLD (N = 17; mean age 10;07 ± 2;01 years) and a typically developing control group matched for age, gender and handedness (N = 22; mean age 11;00 ± 1;11 years) to bilaterally identify the superior longitudinal fascicle, arcuate fascicle, anterior lateral segment and posterior...
Source: Brain Imaging and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
SLPs reading this essay: I have a favor to ask you. Please suspend judgment when reading this post. I’m sharing a time-saving and accurate way to complete one of our most valued activities. And also one of the most despised. The dreaded language sample! I know. Many of us still need counseling from the language sampling rituals we endured in grad school. But things change, and technology and techniques improve, so please read on. Language samples provide some of the most useful information we can gather about a child’s communication because it’s an immediate snapshot of: Utterance length Complexity Artic...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Bilingual assessment bilingual service delivery Language Disorders Source Type: blogs
Conclusions Although further research is needed, these findings suggest that automated measures of vocalizations drawn from daylong recordings are a possible early identification tool for later developmental progress/concerns.Supplemental Materialhttps://osf.io/cdn3v/
Source: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusion Contrary to expectations, after controlling for target word knowledge, spoken word recognition did not differ for children with DLD and TD controls; however, the cognitive processing factors that influenced children's ability to recognize the target word in a stream of speech differed qualitatively for children with and without DLDs.
Source: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS &IMPLICATIONS: Research evidence supporting technology-enabled management of the communication and swallowing disorders in PD is limited and predominantly low in quality. The treatment of the speech disorder online is the most developed aspect of the technology-enabled management pathway. Future research needs to address technology-enabled management of cognitive-communication and swallowing disorders and the use of a more diverse range of technologies and management approaches to optimize SLT service delivery to people with PD. PMID: 29923267 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Int J Lang Commun Disord Source Type: research
This study highlights that, beyond the detrimental effects of tube feeding on quality of life, there could be detrimental effects from non-oral feeding on the health of our patients. This is obviously not the case for all patients, so each individual case needs to be considered, but these studies comparing outcomes are important to consider. Participant: When using the IDDSI (International Dysphagia Diet Standardization Initiative), are there at least two numbers included in a diet order: one for foods and one for liquids? Are dietary departments fully onboard? Rogus-Pulia: My understanding of IDDSI is that, yes,...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Academia & Research Health Care Private Practice Slider Speech-Language Pathology Dysphagia Feeding Disorders nutrition Speech Disorders Swallowing Disorders Source Type: blogs
Publication date: 2018 Source:Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Volume 155 Author(s): Coriene Catsman-Berrevoets, Zoltan Patay Cerebellar mutism most commonly, but not exclusively, develops in children after surgery for midline cerebellar or intraventricular tumors in the posterior fossa, typically medulloblastoma. Cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) comprises a complex set of neurologic and neurocognitive signs and symptoms, the cardinal and central component of which is an initially profound but usually reversible speech disorder. As such, CMS is currently recognized as an extreme form of the so-called cerebellar cognitive a...
Source: Handbook of Clinical Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Meredith Gennaro and Stephanie Sigal are speech-language pathologists who met in September 2017 when they began working with the same child. This school year, I worked with another speech-language pathologist to help 4-year-old Michael improve his articulation and language skills. His parents wanted to supplement his school-based intervention—provided by SLP Meredith Gennaro—so we began working with him simultaneously. We knew we needed to work collaboratively. Using each other’s assets, we could enhance Michael’s progress. These are the steps we took to help Michael along the way. Reach out right ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Language Disorders Speech Disorders Source Type: blogs
(University of Central Florida) Researchers at the University of Central Florida and the University of New Mexico have been awarded a $2.7 million National Institutes of Health grant to study how language therapy, combined with technology, can help children with severe speech disorders communicate.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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