Making the case for active learning

By Dawn Hackman, M.S., AHIP, Research &Education Librarian University of North Dakota Library of the Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND On January 8, 2016 the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) hosted a workshop called “The Librarian and Active Learning Models,” which is available via the Medical Library Association’s Educational Clearinghouse. I worked with the SMHS’s Associate Dean for Teaching &Learning to identify a workshop on active learning that would be relevant to both librarians and faculty. We noticed that this workshop focused on three active learning methodologies that are common to medical education and might be effective at UND. (Incidentally, this workshop is being offered as CE at MLA’16 in Toronto…and I highly recommend it!) The co-instructors for the workshop are based out of the East Coast and so I knew the travel expenses would be considerable. To offset the cost to my library, I applied for (and received) a professional development grant through the GMR. This workshop wouldn’t have been possible without it. My target audience changed between my application and the actual event. Originally I planned on inviting only medical librarians and a handful of SMHS faculty to attend. I targeted medical librarians, because the methodologies were presented in the context of medical education in the class description. However, I soon realized that all UND librarians should be ...
Source: The Cornflower - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Funding General News from the Region Training Source Type: news

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Next month we turn our clocks back as daylight-saving time ends for most of the country. Here at ASHA—at least for those of us maintaining the archives—we already turned back to the year 1936. In honor of October being American Archives Month, the ASHA Archives staff created a new online exhibit sharing the history of our scientific journals. In launching the journals’ long and distinguished history, ASHA printed the first issue of its first journal, Journal of Speech Disorders, in March of 1936. The first issue contained four articles spread across 34 pages. ASHA saw a steady growth in its journals progr...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Audiology News Slider Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 12 October 2018Source: Speech CommunicationAuthor(s): Imed Laaridh, Christine Meunier, Corinne FredouilleAbstractPerceptual evaluation is still the most common method in clinical practice for diagnosing and following the condition progression of people suffering from dysarthria (or speech disorders more generally). Such evaluations are frequently described as non-trivial, subjective and highly time-consuming (depending on the evaluation level). Most of the time, perceptual assessment is performed individually by clinicians which can be problematic since judgment may vary from one clinicia...
Source: Speech Communication - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
When viewers tuned in to the international premiere of “Doctor Who” last week, the hit science fiction show introduced several new characters, including one with dyspraxia. In the episode, the audience meets 19-year-old Ryan Sinclair, who admits he’s frustrated about not knowing how to ride a bike at his age. Ryan is revealed to have the developmental coordination disorder dyspraxia, which prevented him from mastering this skill as child. Even though his grandmother and step-grandfather try to help him, Ryan continues to struggle and fall off his bike. In reality, the actor playing Ryan (Tosin Cole) does ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: News Slider Speech-Language Pathology Apraxia of Speech Childhood Apraxia of Speech communication sciences and disorders dyspraxia motor speech disorders Source Type: blogs
Authors: Mahmut EE, Stoicu-Tivadar V Abstract This paper makes a brief review of several database structures of Computer-Based Speech Therapy (CBST) systems and solutions and describes the screening method, an experimental study conducted to validate the screening algorithm and a database structure for the Information Entropy-Based Sound Speech Disorder (SSD) Screening System aimed at by our research project. The final part briefly presents the essential design criteria and further development. PMID: 30306933 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics - Category: Information Technology Tags: Stud Health Technol Inform Source Type: research
Not using curriculum-based intervention?  You may be working too hard. As a young speech-language pathologist, I was confronted with a large and staggeringly diverse caseload. It nearly brought an immediate end to my early career. I worked across two campuses with 65 Spanish-speaking students and conducted evaluations on another five campuses. Nearly half of my students were 3-year-olds in a half-day program, and many of them had multiple disabilities. I wasn’t alone. Educators in my district also taught students from a range of cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Working with students from diverse backgrounds ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Early Intervention Language Disorders Speech Disorders Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS &IMPLICATIONS: This study profiled the skills contributing to oral inferential comprehension in young children with DLD, to support the clinical and theoretical understanding of the ability in this population. The findings have implications for future intervention studies. PMID: 30294839 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Int J Lang Commun Disord Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Epilepsy &Behavior, Volume 88Author(s): Jacopo Lanzone, Lorenzo Ricci, Giovanni Assenza, Martina Ulivi, Vincenzo Di Lazzaro, Mario TombiniAbstractObjectiveTransient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is an underestimated condition in emergency clinical setting, where most of transient amnesic episodes tend to be classified as transient global amnesia (TGA). We designed this study to evaluate the actual frequency of TEA in a real-life scenario and to highlight the features that can help clinicians distinguishing it from TGA.MethodsWe retrospectively collected clinical data of 83 patients who ...
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Adjusting live performances to fit the needs of audience members with autism or other sensory issues is nothing new. Creating an interactive show especially suited to a neurodiverse audience is less common. Staff and students from Michigan State University’s (MSU) theater department created “Farm! A Musical Experience,” to fit exactly that niche. According to articles published by ABC News, MSU theater faculty member and outreach coordinator Dionne O’Dell worked with a class of students last year to create “Farm.” First, O’Dell visited and worked with theater companies special...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Academia & Research Health Care Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Autism Spectrum Disorder Language Disorders Speech Disorders Source Type: blogs
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is an underestimated condition in emergency clinical setting, where most of transient amnesic episodes tend to be classified as transient global amnesia (TGA). We designed this study to evaluate the actual frequency of TEA in a real-life scenario and to highlight the features that can help clinicians distinguishing it from TGA. METHODS: We retrospectively collected clinical data of 83 patients who accessed our emergency ward for an abrupt onset of amnesic disorder, initially interpreted as TGA. All patients underwent neurological evaluation, magnetic reson...
Source: Epilepsy and Behaviour - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Epilepsy Behav Source Type: research
Conclusions: These findings build on prior work implicating poor fine motor control in child language disorders by identifying a robust relationship between manual dexterity and nonword repetition. Relationships between manual dexterity and receptive language abilities appear to be indirect and mediated by nonword repetition. For clinicians, the results underscore the importance of screening children with poor fine motor control for concomitant language impairments. PMID: 30286244 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch Source Type: research
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