Learning From Others: How to Make School (Lunch) Great

Steve Jobs famously said: "we have always been shameless about stealing great ideas." In his latest documentary, Where To Invade Next, Michael Moore "invades" country after country, looking for lifestyles worth appropriating - so that he can plant the American flag upon them and bring them home. Of particular interest to me were his school visits. The French school dining experience Moore sits for a one-hour lunch in a French school cafeteria and is served a four-course meal, in real plates, with water in a real glass. He brings a can of Coke with him, and asks the kids if they ever drink that. None of them do, and none are interested in trying. There are no sugary drinks or vending machines in French schools. Meals are planned by a chef and a planning committee and cooked from scratch. There's always a cheese course -- the favorite cheese in that particular school is Camembert. There are no "kid's foods" served and French fries are a biannual dish. Moore visits an ordinary school, he claims, in a lower-income neighborhood. I do believe that he didn't cherry pick a French school lunch, as there are multiple such reports, and the nutrition standards of the school lunch are set by government policy. French kids do eat better, and that they get a culinary education at school that lasts a lifetime, and results in better health and lower obesity rates. Their school cafeteria reflects widespread French values, and the school environment is consistent with what many parents do at ho...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news