The Grain Deficiency Syndrome

Beware the dreaded Grain Deficiency Syndrome. This is what will happen to you if you eliminate wheat, corn, and other grains, the foods that the USDA and U.S. Dept of Health and Human services tell us, through their Dietary Guidelines for Americans, to eat more of, every day, every meal and snack. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the American Heart Association, and the American Diabetes Association also all agree: Terrible things will happen to you if you eliminate grains. You will develop Grain Deficiency! So what does the Grain Deficiency Syndrome look like? Like any other syndrome, you can recognize this condition by its many tell-tale signs: Flat abdomen Rapid weight loss High energy Less mood swings Better sleep, vivid dreams, less restless legs Diminished appetite, freedom from food obsessions, heightened sense of taste Reduced blood sugar, reduced insulin Reduced blood pressure Reduced small LDL and total LDL Increased HDL cholesterol Reduced triglycerides Reduced C-reactive protein and other inflammatory measures Reduced joint pain Relief from acid reflux, esophagitis, and irritable bowel syndrome Reversal of autoimmune conditions Loss of facial and leg edema/swelling Reduced migraine and other headaches Reduced seizures, especially temporal lobe Reduced asthma and sinus congestion Of course, you could choose to cure yourself of this syndrome simply by taking the antidote: foods made with grains like bread, breakfast cereals, pastas, pretzels, crackers, muffi...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood sugar cholesterol diabetes Inflammation minerals vitamins Weight Loss wheat deficiency Source Type: blogs

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Authors: Rombauts A, Abelenda-Alonso G, Cuervo G, Gudiol C, Carratalà J Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite adequate antibiotic coverage, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality worldwide. It induces both a local pulmonary and a systemic inflammatory response, particularly significant in severe cases. The intensity of the dysregulated host response varies from patient to patient and has a negative impact on survival and other outcomes. AREAS COVERED: This comprehensive review summarizes the pathophysiological aspects of the inflammatory response in CAP, brie...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
We describe the most highly recommended generic and disease-specific PRO tools in SCD and discuss the challenges of incorporating them in clinical practice. EXPERT OPINION: PRO measures are essential to incorporate into SCD clinical trials either as primary or secondary outcomes. The use of PRO measures in SCD facilitates a patient-centered approach, which is likely to lead to improved outcomes. Significant challenges remain in adapting PRO tools to routine clinical use and in developing countries. PMID: 33034214 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: Expert Rev Hematol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Journal of Genetics and GenomicsAuthor(s): Huiyun Liu, Ke Wang, Huali Tang, Qiang Gong, Lipu Du, Xinwu Pei, Xingguo Ye
Source: Journal of Genetics and Genomics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Currently in fellowship doing bread/butter procedures (MBB, epidurals, PNB, few SCS/PNS trials, etc.) and just interviewed at a private practice spot where they do a lot of procedures that I will have not done any training in prior to graduating (e.g. IT pump, SI fusion, Vertiflex, Kypho, MILD, Discectomy, lots of SCS/PNS trials etc) and significant amount of "OR pain procedures" at a very busy practice seeing 30-40 pts/day - how many of you are commonly performing these procedures and are... private practice concern
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pain Medicine Source Type: forums
CONCLUSION: The proposed PHARMAC criteria will give access to these important drugs to those people with T2DM who will likely benefit the most. PMID: 33032305 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
Authors: Siamashvili M, Davis S Abstract INTRODUCTION: Bromocriptine mesylate quick release (QR) is a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and is the only oral, primarily centrally acting drug that can be used for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. AREAS COVERED: The authors describe current recommendations on the use of bromocriptine mesylate QR. Major efficacy and safety parameters of the late phase trials, including The Cycloset Safety Trial, have been identified and presented. EXPERT OPINION: Efficacy of bromocriptine mesylate QR monotherapy appears to be low but is compensated by favorable safety pr...
Source: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Pharmacother Source Type: research
In this study, we explored its health effects on the female offspring of mice that had been exposed during pregnancy. We found that exposure of pregnant mice to nitenpyram resulted in decreased levels of serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and glucose in female offspring, and additional research uncovered gut microbiota disturbances, accompanied by abnormal fecal metabolic profiles. Based on Pearson correlation analysis, we found that decreased abundance of Lactobacillus may play the most critical role, and changes in gut bacterial purine metabolism, BCAAs metabolism, and the TCA cycle are all closely related to the ab...
Source: Chemosphere - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Chemosphere Source Type: research
Acceptance of trauma can also help to reduce its damaging effects. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Sleep subscribers-only Source Type: blogs
Publication date: December 2020Source: Journal of Functional Foods, Volume 75Author(s): Tingting Wang, Lin Zheng, Tiantian Zhao, Qi Zhang, Zhitong Liu, Xiaoling Liu, Mouming Zhao
Source: Journal of Functional Foods - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Neurología (English Edition)Author(s): N. Morollón, R. Belvís, A. De Dios, N. Pagès, C. González-Oria, G. Latorre, S. Santos-Lasaosa
Source: Neurologia - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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