Male Childhood Cancer Survivors Less Likely to Have Kids, Study Finds

But Norwegian researchers also found no increased risk of birth defects or delivery complications Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Cancer in Children, Male Infertility
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Small higher risk of non-invasive breast and ovarian tumours may not be due to treatment Related items fromOnMedica Only a third of women with regular bloating would see their GP Infertility much more likely after childhood cancer Unprotected sex among British teens – soars Experts call for wider HPV vaccination Use of contraceptive pill may lead to longer life
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Publication date: April 2018Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Obstetrics &Gynaecology, Volume 48Author(s): Gabriela N. Algarroba, Joseph S. Sanfilippo, Hanna Valli-PulaskiAbstractThe 5-year survival rate for childhood cancer is over 80%, thereby increasing the number of young women facing infertility in the future because of the gonadotoxic effects of chemotherapy and radiation. The gonadotoxic effects of childhood cancer treatment vary by the radiation regimen and the chemotherapeutic drugs utilized. Although the American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines recommend fertility preservation for all patie...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Many survivors of childhood cancer will experience premature gonadal insufficiency or infertility as a consequence of their medical treatments. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation (OTC) remains an experimental means of fertility preservation with few reports focused on the surgical technique and postoperative outcomes for OTC in children.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionAlthough this population of women has above average knowledge scores, they still demonstrated a desire for more information on reproduction after cancer therapy. While PedsQL scores fell within a normal range, survivors report infertility would cause negative emotions.Implication for cancer survivorsThis information can be used refine educational programs within survivorship clinics to improve knowledge of post-treatment reproductive health.
Source: Supportive Care in Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Cancer, EarlyView.
Source: Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Short Report Source Type: research
AbstractAdult survivors of childhood cancers are more prone to developing poor reproductive and obstetrical outcomes than their siblings and the general population as a result of previous exposure to chemotherapy and radiation during childhood. Chemotherapy drugs exert cytotoxic effects systemically and therefore can damage the ovaries, leading to infertility, premature ovarian failure, and, to a lesser extent, spontaneous abortions. They have very limited or no deleterious effects on the uterus that can be recognized clinically. By contrast, radiation is detrimental to both the ovaries and the uterus, thereby causing a gr...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review, Gynecologic Oncology Source Type: research
Authors: Gravholt CH, Chang S, Wallentin M, Fedder J, Moore P, Skakkebæk A Abstract Although first identified over 70 years ago, Klinefelter syndrome (KS) continue to pose significant diagnostic challenges, as many patients are still misdiagnosed, or remain undiagnosed. In fact, as few as 25% of KS patients are accurately diagnosed, and most of these diagnoses are not made until adulthood. Classic characteristics of KS include small testes, infertility, hypergonadothropic hypogonadism, and cognitive impairment. However, the pathophysiology behind KS is not well understood, although genetic effects are also th...
Source: Endocrine Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Endocr Rev Source Type: research
UCLA researchers have made new inroads into understanding germ cell tumors, a diverse and rare group of cancers that begin in germ cells — the cells that develop into sperm and eggs. The researchers developed a protocol to recreate germ cell tumor cells from stem cells and used the new model to study the genetics of the cancer.Their findings could point the way toward new drugs to treat germ cell tumors, which account for around 3 percent of all cases of childhood and adolescent cancer.The study, published in Stem Cell Research, was led by Amander Clark, a UCLA professor of molecular cell and developmental biology an...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Abstract Adult survivors of childhood cancers are more prone to developing poor reproductive and obstetrical outcomes than their siblings and the general population as a result of previous exposure to chemotherapy and radiation during childhood. Chemotherapy drugs exert cytotoxic effects systemically and therefore can damage the ovaries, leading to infertility, premature ovarian failure, and, to a lesser extent, spontaneous abortions. They have very limited or no deleterious effects on the uterus that can be recognized clinically. By contrast, radiation is detrimental to both the ovaries and the uterus, thereby ca...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Oncologist Source Type: research
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