Mobile phone use 'linked to poor sperm quality'

Conclusion This cross-sectional study included just 80 Israeli men who were already experiencing fertility problems and had been referred for semen analysis. The men answered questions on their mobile phone use at the same time. The research found a couple of links with sperm concentration – a greater number of men with abnormal concentration reported speaking on their phone for more than an hour a day, and speaking while their phone was on charge. There were no links seen with semen volume and sperm motility. Sperm morphology couldn't be assessed because only one man had abnormal morphology. The study has a number of important limitations, which means it can tell us very little about whether there could be a link between radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation and semen quality. The study assessed semen quality and mobile phone use at the same time, and this can't prove cause and effect. Though the men could be said to be reporting on past use, we don't know when their fertility problems may have started – for example, how long they had abnormal concentration for – or how well the phone use reported reflects longer-term use patterns. For example, if the men report speaking on their mobile phone for more than an hour every day or speaking while the phone was on charge, we don't know whether this is something they do occasionally or whether they have done this every single day for a number of years. It was a ver...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

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Source: BJOG : An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: BJOG Source Type: research
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