ICYMI: Explaining Ted Cruz's Face And A Zika Conspiracy Theory

ICYMI Health features what we're reading this week. This week, we read up on companies using their employees' health data to help workers get healthier, reduce health care costs and improve their bottom lines. On its face, this might seem like a good thing for everyone involved, but the possibility that the data could also be used for hiring and firing decisions is cause for concern. And in lighter news, a neurologist answered a question the American people have been wondering since Ted Cruz first appeared on the political stage: What is it about Cruz's expression that's so unlikeable? Read on and tell us in the comments: What did you read and love this week? 1. A Viral Story Links The Zika Crisis To Monsanto. Don't Believe It. -- The Huffington Post Experts say the rapidly spreading pyriproxyfen conspiracy theory is just that -- a conspiracy theory. An adult human would have to eat a teaspoon of raw pesticide to be poisoned by the chemical and a person would have to drink over 1,000 liters of pyriproxyfen-treated water every day to feel any negative effects. BONUS: Listen to HuffPost's Anna Almendrala digging into her story during a chat with On The Media's Bob Garfield: 2. How People Learn To Become Resilient -- New Yorker Decades of psychology research show that resilience -- or thriving in the face of adversity -- can be taught, but it's also incredibly easy to undo that teaching. Frame adversity as a challenge, and you become more flexible and able to deal with it,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Conclusion The results obtained from this research shows, in general, the fragility in the social and political infrastructure necessary to improve the living conditions of populations, particularly those that depend on family agriculture in drought prone areas. The conditions of social, economic and environmental vulnerabilities presented in the region can be amplified by the drought process, and can aggravate the impacts resulting drought events, thus disadvantaging the population of this region, as shown in the Fig. 1. The general perception of the interviewees of the health sector shows an agreement with what is found...
Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
Council on Foreign Relations. 08/01/2016 This Expert Brief examines the Zika virus, which poses a serious and unique public health threat to the United States. When summer heat waves hit the north, mosquitoes will emerge from their winter sleep. The brief discusses how with rising moist temperatures, the challenge of preventive action against potential mosquito carriers of the virus gets harder, and risks for people rise. Topics include the risks to pregnant women, potential birth defects, and the status of tracking the epidemic. (Text)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Source Type: news
Alice felt ecstatic when she saw the two dark pink lines on her pregnancy test. She wasn’t surprised when fatigue and nausea soon followed. But Alice began to worry when she couldn’t sleep and became engulfed in sadness that eclipsed her maternal joy. She confided in a couple of close girlfriends. “Everyone told me that […]Related:More parents believe vaccines are ‘unnecessary,’ while a mumps outbreak growsSingapore Zika cases rise to 56 at one construction site; Malaysia starts border screeningCPAP machines don’t prevent heart attacks, strokes in some sleep apnea sufferers
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Rio de Janeiro is expecting about 500,000 visitors for the Olympic and Paralympic games this August. If you’re one of them, there are a few things you need to consider in order to have a safe, happy and healthy trip to Brazil this year.   1. Make sure you’re up to date on all your vaccines. This is travel safety 101. Infectious disease loves a crowd, and one way to make sure a nasty bug doesn't hitch a ride with you is to get vaccinated.  What to do:  Make an appointment with a travel doctor now to make sure you’re current on all your regular vaccines (measles, mumps, rubella, etc.) an...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
This study suggests that the risk of microcephaly is especially high with a Zika infection during the first trimester of pregnancy. Teams of scientists from CDC are now in Brazil, where the connection was first identified, working with local health officials to conduct the first large-scale investigation into Zika and microcephaly. That research will take time. We now know that when a woman becomes infected with rubella, also known as German measles, during her first trimester of pregnancy, her baby has up to an 80 percent chance of being born with a wide range of birth defects -- including deafness, eye defects, heart de...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The world is in a frenzy over the Zika virus. Researchers established a link between its rise in Brazil and cases of congenital microcephaly in babies of infected pregnant women, with infants born with smaller than expected heads and improper brain development. As of November last year, Brazil's northeastern state of Pernambuco recorded 646 babies born with microcephaly. On February 1, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the virus and its suspected link to birth defects an international public health emergency. Though we don't yet understand the exact relationship between Zika and microcephaly, there is clear cau...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
On Monday, the World Health Organization declared a "public health emergency of international concern" due to the cluster of birth defects potentially linked to Zika virus.   No one is probably more concerned about this connection than the world’s pregnant women, especially those who are living in an area where there is ongoing Zika virus transmission. While the virus’ symptoms (fever, headache, joint pain, conjunctivitis) are no cause for alarm and rarely require hospitalization, the disease is suspected of causing severe birth defects like microcephaly, when a baby is born with an abnormally sm...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
A mosquito-borne virus that may have caused serious birth defects for thousands of babies in Brazil made its way to Puerto Rico by the end of last year, and experts are grappling with what this means -- if anything -- for North America. Zika has been characterized in the past as an annoying but generally harmless sickness, with symptoms like rash, fever, joint-pain and red eyes. In fact, about one in four who get infected with disease probably don't even notice they have it. But when the virus became widespread in Brazil in 2015, with an estimated 500,000 to 1.5 million residents contracting Zika, health officials noticed ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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