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New Cancer Therapy Could Give Hope To 'Incurable' Patients

A new experimental treatment has achieved what chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants have failed to do: put chronic, relapsing blood cancers into remission. What's more, it uses the body's own natural defense system to attack these cancerous growths.  The treatment involves T cells, a type of immune cell that works as your body's own personal S.W.A.T. team to detect, surround, and destroy foreign invaders like bacteria or viruses. Historically, cancerous cells have grown too fast for T cells to mount an effective defense, and they can also trick T cells into thinking that they’re a healthy part of the body as opposed to a cancerous growth that needs to be stopped. But in experimental treatments at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, initial evidence shows Dr. Stanley Riddell has successfully trained these T cells to better recognize and eliminate cancer cells in a short time span, allowing cancer to go into remission.  Specifically, he extracted a person's T cells in order to prime them to recognize the type of cancer that is affecting the patient, allowing these primed T cells to attack the growth while sparing healthy cells and tissue.  The results Riddell's preliminary findings on the success of T cell therapy to cure previously terminal cases of cancer made a stir at an annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C. on Sunday because of his eye-popping results: 93 perc...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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As the nation’s opioid epidemic rages on, the federal agency charged with leading the government’s response to substance abuse is changing the way it helps local communities. But critics say the move risks leaving programs with fewer resources until the new plan is in place. The controversy began in January with a low-key announcement by the […]Related:E. coli outbreak spreads as source of tainted lettuce remains a mysteryFirst marijuana-derived drug poised for FDA approval after winning support from advisersHave you or someone you know waited too long for an organ transplant?
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion: Our case report underlines the importance of active endoscopic surveillance of the remaining colon and rectum in patients with diverting stomas and inflammatory bowel disease in order to detect stenosis. If endoscopic control is not possible due to obliteration, surgical therapy must be discussed due to the risk of developing cancer.Case Rep Gastroenterol 2018;12:143 –146
Source: Case Reports in Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Conclusions: This study is the first nationwide study presenting an increase in incidence of EP-NEC patients from 196 to 260 cases annually in the Netherlands. We found the best 5 year relative survival to be for EP-NEC patients with local disease located in the bladder, where the worst 5 year relative survival was found in the oesophagus.
Source: Neuroendocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Mauro Di Ianni, Stefano Baldoni, Beatrice Del Papa, Patrizia Aureli, Erica Dorillo, Filomena De Falco, Elisa Albi, Emanuela Varasano, Ambra Di Tommaso, Raffaella Giancola, Patrizia Accorsi, Gianluca Rotta, Chiara Rompietti, Estev ão Carlos Silva Barcelos, Antonio Francesco Campese, Paolo Di Bartolomeo, Isabella Screpanti, Emanuela Rosati, Franca Falzetti, Paolo Sportoletti
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Preeti Kanikarla-Marie, Michael Lam, Alexey V. Sorokin, Michael J. Overman, Scott Kopetz, David G. Menter
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Karine A. Al Feghali, Rami A. Ballout, Assem M. Khamis, Elie A. Akl, Fady B. Geara
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Mayra A. Carrillo, Anjie Zhen, Scott G. Kitchen
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Lisanne Lutter, Julia Spierings, Femke C. C. van Rhijn-Brouwer, Jacob M. van Laar, Femke van Wijk
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
PROSTATE cancer symptoms can be hard to spot, especially in the early stages. As it progresses, signs of the disease can begin to show, and if the cancer grows outside of the prostate, and other symptoms can develop, including three related to sex.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that gastric cancer cells induce the transition of pericytes to CAFs by exosomes-mediated BMP transfer and PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathway activation, and suggest that pericytes may be an important source of CAFs. PMID: 29668670 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
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