Link between indigestion drugs and dementia 'inconclusive'

Conclusion This study found people taking PPIs had a 44% higher risk of developing dementia in a seven-year period compared with those not taking the drugs. However, it's not accurate to say this was down to the PPIs – the study couldn't prove this, and there are many possible explanations. For a start, the groups weren't very similar. Those taking PPIs had poorer health, and were more likely to be taking a number of medicines and have conditions linked to a higher risk of dementia, such as diabetes and heart disease. After taking these factors into account in the analysis, the link between PPIs and dementia reduced from 66% to 44%. It's possible this adjustment wasn't complete (residual confounding), or that many other factors not measured in this study could further explain the remaining risk increase (bias). A study where the characteristics of the two groups are more closely matched would be a positive next step for this research area.  The study also focused solely on PPIs, which are mainly prescribed for the protection and management of stomach ulcers. It does not apply to indigestion treatments like over-the-counter antacid treatments you might take for heartburn or indigestion, which work in a different way by neutralising excess stomach acid. These limitations mean you should not stop taking prescribed PPIs. The link with dementia is uncertain, and is likely to be outweighed by the benefit of protecting the stomach&n...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Neurology Older people Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 6 April 2020Source: Indian Heart JournalAuthor(s): Samit Ghosal, Binayak Sinha, Jignesh Ved, Mansij Biswas
Source: Indian Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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Source: Current Opinion in Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: MOLECULAR GENETICS: Edited by Ali J. Marian Source Type: research
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Source: Current Opinion in Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: CARDIAC FAILURE: Edited by Rebecca Cogswell and Gene Kim Source Type: research
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Source: Current Opinion in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: HEAD AND NECK: Edited by Joël Guigay Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Pain Research - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Journal of Pain Research Source Type: research
Purpose of review One of the defining trends of population movement in the last half century has been global urbanization. Depression is the most common mental disorder in the world, but it is unclear how urbanization and urban living affect depression outcomes. Grounded in a previously articulated conceptual framework, we systematically reviewed recently published studies on urbanization, urbanicity, and depression. Recent findings Eleven articles were included in this review. Four studies found that living in urban areas was associated with elevated odds or more symptoms of depression. Three studies – all done...
Source: Current Opinion in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: THE IMPACT OF URBANISATION ON MENTAL HEALTH: Edited by Jair Mari Source Type: research
Purpose of review People with Down syndrome represent the world's largest population with a genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease. This review will provide a short summary of what is known and will include recent findings from the field. Recent findings There has been an increasing focus on biomarker research in this population, with a number of studies presenting findings on promising new markers – Neurofilament Light (NfL) appears to be one such promising marker that has emerged. Imaging studies have increased our knowledge on the progression of Alzheimer's disease in this population. Summary The inclusion o...
Source: Current Opinion in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY Source Type: research
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Source: Current Opinion in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY Source Type: research
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Source: RSC - Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Source Type: research
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