Pelvic inflammatory disease can leave women infertile but often has no symptoms

Pelvic inflammatory disease is an infection of a woman’s reproductive organs, often triggered by an STI. Left untreated, it can cause infertility, chronic pelvic pain and ectopic pregnancy.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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​BY GREGORY TAYLOR, DO, &FRANK SCHELL, DOA 30-year-old woman presented to the ED complaining of pelvic pain. She said she felt an acute onset of sharp lower right pelvic pain during intercourse two days earlier. The pain continued to worsen, becoming diffuse. She was also experiencing nausea, vomiting, malaise, anorexia, and vaginal spotting. She had no history or concern for sexually transmitted disease, and had no fever or vaginal discharge. She had had a previous Cesarean section and bilateral tubal ligation.Her vital signs were a heart rate of 110 bpm, a respiratory rate of 25 bpm, a blood pressure of 113/88 mm H...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Biomedicine &Pharmacotherapy, Volume 107Author(s): An Wei, Hao Feng, Xiao-Min Jia, Hua Tang, Yang-Ying Liao, Bi-Rong LiAbstractAs a common cause of infertility, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is characterized by chronic pain, ectopic pregnancy as well as inflammation and infection of the female upper genital tract. Ozone water, also known as O3, has been previously reported to be a distinctly effective agent in treating inflammation. During the present study, we asserted the hypothesis that O3 could be applied by pelvic inflammation and works to regulate the expression of infla...
Source: Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Sexually transmitted disease (STD) rates in the U.S. are at a record high for the fourth year in a row, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). All told, nearly 2.3 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis were diagnosed in the U.S. in 2017. That’s 200,000 more cases than were diagnosed in 2016, a year that also had a record-high number of cases, according to the CDC. “We are now very concerned about this steep and sustained increase that we’re seeing,” says Dr. Gail Bolan, the director of the CDC’s Division of STD Prevention. “We’...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Sex/Relationships Source Type: news
Publication date: March 2018Source: Arab Journal of Urology, Volume 16, Issue 1Author(s): Scott D. Lundy, Edmund S. SabaneghAbstractDespite being first described two thousand years ago, the varicocele remains a controversial multifaceted disease process with numerous biological consequences including infertility, hypogonadism, and chronic orchidalgia. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood and likely include hypoxia, oxidative stress, hyperthermia, anatomical aberrations, and genetics as primary components. Despite a high prevalence amongst asymptomatic fertile men, varicoceles paradoxically also represent the ...
Source: Arab Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
You couldn’t get pregnant easily, and needed fertility treatments. You had a miscarriage. Or several. You developed complications during your pregnancy. You delivered your baby preterm. Every single one of Parijat Deshpande’s clients feels like their bodies have betrayed them because of the above reasons. Deshpande, MS, is a perinatal mind-body wellness counselor and high-risk pregnancy expert, who helps women navigate stress so they can manage pregnancy complications and give their baby a strong start to life. Psychologist Julie Bindeman, PsyD, works with women struggling with reproductive challenges, depressi...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Women's Issues Betrayal Fertility miscarriage Parenthood Pregnancy Source Type: blogs
Publication date: March 2018Source: Arab Journal of Urology, Volume 16, Issue 1Author(s): Scott D. Lundy, Edmund S. SabaneghAbstractDespite being first described two thousand years ago, the varicocele remains a controversial multifaceted disease process with numerous biological consequences including infertility, hypogonadism, and chronic orchidalgia. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood and likely include hypoxia, oxidative stress, hyperthermia, anatomical aberrations, and genetics as primary components. Despite a high prevalence amongst asymptomatic fertile men, varicoceles paradoxically also represent the ...
Source: Arab Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
When my first period came at age 13, it involved blood clots and extreme pain. I didn’t know what to expect or what was considered “normal,” but thankfully, my mother did. She recognized that my symptoms were unusual and immediately took me to see my pediatrician. I was first prescribed birth control pills, which seemed to help initially, but when my period remained heavy and painful, I was put on a different birth control pill that enabled me to have my period only four times a year. I thought my situation was normal – albeit uncomfortable and inconvenient. No one ever suggested that painful period...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Teen Health endometriosis Marc Laufer Source Type: news
Andrea Syrtash was first hospitalized at the age of 14 for painful and heavy menstrual cycles due to endometriosis. She had no idea her condition would affect her fertility ― and even if she had known, she may not have thought to address it without guidance from her doctors. After six years of trying to conceive, Syrtash, who’s now in her 40s and works as a relationship and dating expert, recently founded pregnantish, a website for singles, couples and LGBTQ people who are trying to conceive.  “When you’re a teenager, it’s not on your mind,” she said. Had she known, “I migh...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
When it comes to talking about sex, sexuality and sexual health, we’ve come a long way – in some respects. Today, the reality of sexual assault on college campuses, abortion rights, gender and sexual identity and access to contraception are part of an important national dialogue, one that is both political and personal. At the American Sexual Health Association (ASHA), our definition of sexual health is, by necessity, broad. Among other things, sexual health encompasses access to sexual health information, education and medical care; being informed and empowered regarding pregnancy and family planning; prevent...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
For Glamour, by Suzannah Weiss. Nobody wants to hear it, but it’s true: sexually transmitted infections are incredibly common, and even the most careful among us can contract them. Culturally we are trying to talk about the realities of STIs more often, but there are still a lot of misconceptions out there. If you’ve heard one of these myths repeated, we’re declaring once and for all: It’s not true. 1. If you had one, you would know. Half the human population gets an STI at some point in their life, and a lot of them don’t know it. “STIs can fly beneath the radar for months or even year...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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