Follow the poodle? Alternatives to prescription sleep medications

A contemporary author once wrote, “The night is the hardest time to be alive and 4 a.m. knows all my secrets.” If you haven’t been sleeping well for a while, this quote might feel like your new reality. You might even find yourself tempted by the happy poodles and free-floating butterflies on TV imploring you to ask your doctor about their new drugs for insomnia. But, before answering their siren call, you pause. You notice the side effects are rattled off rapidly and are difficult to understand. You are worried about being “hooked” on them forever. You ask yourself, is there another way to get better sleep? The answer is an emphatic “Yes!” CBT: A clear winner for insomnia Sleep specialists now agree that behavioral (non-drug) techniques should be the first approach to treatment of most cases of chronic insomnia. The best studied of these is cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT. The goal of CBT is to address harmful behaviors and misbeliefs that are causing and perpetuating insomnia. Components of CBT include restricting time in bed, disrupting the negative association between failure to sleep and the bedroom environment, and correcting any negative or inaccurate beliefs about sleep. In large-scale studies, CBT has been shown to be equally effective as drug treatment for insomnia. Importantly, improvement in sleep is longer-lasting after CBT than with drug treatment or the combination of drug treatment and CBT. Until recently, the use...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Complementary and alternative medicine Drugs and Supplements Sleep Source Type: news

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R. Nicholas Carleton Poor sleep quality is associated with numerous mental health concerns and poorer overall physical health. Sleep disturbances are commonly reported by public safety personnel (PSP) and may contribute to the risk of developing mental disorders or exacerbate mental disorder symptoms. The current investigation was designed to provide estimates of sleep disturbances among PSP and explore the relationship between sleep quality and mental health status. PSP completed screening measures for sleep quality and diverse mental disorders through an online survey. Respondents (5813) were grouped into six catego...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
What are the Signs of Opioid Use? Opioids are a group of drugs derived naturally from the poppy plant, or are man-made in a laboratory, also known as synthetic opioids. Opioids are generally prescribed to individuals suffering from chronic pain, whether from surgery, a major injury or other health issues. Legally prescribed opioids include morphine, codeine, and oxycodone, while illegal opioids include heroin. It is easy to know if an individual is using opioids if they’ve been prescribed, but it is also important to know the signs of opioid use if it has crossed the line into an addiction. Signs and Symptoms There a...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Painkiller opioid opioids prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug detox prescription drugs prescription medication signs of addiction Source Type: blogs
Insomnia can be a disruptive condition that affects your entire life. When you aren’t able to sleep at night, it can negatively impact issues in almost every area of your life and well-being. If you are taking sleeping pills or are thinking about starting to take sleeping pills, make sure you know as much as possible about all the sleeping pill side effects. What Are Sleeping Pills and How Do They Work? Sleeping pills are used to treat insomnia. According to the National Sleep Foundation, insomnia is described as difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, even when a person has the chance to do so. People with ins...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Sleep healthy sleep insomnia sleep aids sleep and chronobiology laboratory sleep deprivation sleep disorder treatment sleep disorders sleep duration sleep habits sleeping sleeping pills sleeplessness Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsA history of MST is common among older women veterans and associated with a range of medical and mental health diagnoses. These findings call attention to the need for additional research in this understudied population, and the importance of trauma-informed care approaches for women across the lifespan.
Source: Journal of General Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Source Type: research
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — Many of us begin to groan and moan as our precious weekend comes to an end. It’s not just the interruption of fun with friends and family that triggers the Sunday blues, or what some call the Sunday scaries. It’s also anxiety and dread about the workweek to come. One study found 81% of more than 1,000 respondents said they became progressively more anxious as their restful Sunday came to a close. Psychologists call it “anticipatory anxiety.” Nearly two-thirds reported a restless night’s sleep Sunday night, which they attributed to job-related anxi...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Featured Health News CNN Mental Health Source Type: news
Your Guide to Vicodin Addiction and Vicodin Withdrawal Hydrocodone (also known by the brand name Vicodin®) has been the second-most commonly encountered opioid pharmaceutical in drug evidence since 2009, as reported by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Withdrawal from Vicodin can vary in length and symptoms depending on the length and severity of the addiction. Vicodin is relatively easy to obtain and is perceived as safe when prescribed by a medical professional. If the drug is taken as prescribed for a limited time, Vicodin withdrawal symptoms will be either minimal or nonexistent. However, Vicodin is consid...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Recovery Drug Treatment Painkiller Substance Abuse painkillers prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug detox prescription drug use prescription drugs prescription medication prescription pills Source Type: blogs
According to a recently-published interview with John Torous, MD, MBI, Director of the Digital Psychiatry Division at the Department of Psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, there are seven great evidenced-based mental health apps you should consider. Evidence-based means they’ve met the minimum requirements by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or have at least one randomized clinical research study that supports their use and effectiveness. The recommendation for these evidence-based mental health apps comes in an interview with Dr. Torous found in the Oct. 2019 issue of The Carlat Psychiatr...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Psychology Self-Help Technology evidence-based mental health apps Smartphone Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence for differential relations between markers, depressive symptoms, and covariates. Associations between symptoms and markers were attenuated after covariate adjustment; BMI and sex consistently showed strong relations with inflammatory markers. PMID: 31615595 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Psychological Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Psychol Med Source Type: research
We present recommendations for research and clinical practice based on the current review. PMID: 31360174 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Environmental and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Tags: J Environ Public Health Source Type: research
Over the last 12 months New Zealanders have entered into the debate about cannabis and cannabinoids for medical use. In the coming year we’ll hear even more about cannabis as we consider legalising cannabis for recreational use. There is so much rhetoric around the issue, and so much misinformation I thought it high time (see what I did there?!) to write about where I see the research is at for cannabis and cannabinoids for persistent pain. For the purposes of this blog, I’m going to use the following definitions: Cannabis = the plant; cannabis-based medication = registered extracts (either synthetic or from...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Coping strategies Research Science in practice cannabinoids cannabis medicinal cannabis neuropathic pain persistent pain recreational cannabis Source Type: blogs
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