Proton beam therapy 'effective' and 'causes fewer side effects'

ConclusionThis phase II study looked at the long-term side effects of using proton radiotherapy as part of the treatment of children with medulloblastoma. The treatment was used alongside standard surgical removal and chemotherapy. The current study is reported to be the longest prospective follow-up study available on this treatment for medulloblastoma.Overall, 12% of the study's participants had severe hearing loss three years after proton radiotherapy, and 16% at five years. This was reported by the authors to be less than the equivalent 23 Gy dose of standard (photon) radiotherapy, which was said to cause hearing loss in about a quarter (25%) of those receiving it. However, as the researchers say, these comparisons are not completely reliable because of the different doses used. Cognitive impairment was also slightly less than has been observed with standard radiotherapy – 1.5 IQ points in this study, and 1.9 with photon radiotherapy in other studies. Again, the researchers caution over the differences in radiation doses used and population treated.  Progression-free and overall survival rates in this study were reported to be much the same as those using standard radiotherapy. There was also a lack of reported toxic effects to the heart, lungs or digestive system.        Overall, the results seem positive. The difficulty is that this is a non-comparative trial. All children received proton radiotherapy. There was no randomise...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medical practice Source Type: news

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ConclusionsAdvances in the neoadjuvant treatment of rectal tumors contributed to better rates of complete pathological responses. New paradigms promote an increase in the complete clinical response rates, which would allow organ preservation and consequent reduction of surgical morbidity.ResumoObjetivoDescrever os resultados parciais de estudo em pacientes com câncer de reto submetidos a tratamento neoadjuvante com quimioterapia e radioterapia quanto à taxa resposta clínica completa, sobrevida livre de doença, função anorretal e qualidade de vida.Material e métodosEstudo pros...
Source: Journal of Coloproctology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
ConclusionProgramming surgery more than eight weeks after chemoradiotherapy seems preferable to the six to eight weeks most recently practiced, increasing tumor downstaging and having higher complete pathological response rates.ResumoObjetivos do estudoAvaliar o timing ideal entre a terapêutica neoadjuvante e cirúrgica no carcinoma do reto e a sua influência nos outcomes de tratamento.Material e métodosUtilizando a “PubMed”, foi feita uma revisão sistemática da literatura disponível acerca da influência do timing cirúrgico após quimiorradioterap...
Source: Journal of Coloproctology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2018Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Volume 56, Issue 10Author(s): Rhea Chouhan, Patel Raveena, Alexander Rickart, Richard Umasuthan, Kaveh Shakib
Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2018Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Volume 56, Issue 10Author(s): Olivia Johnson King, Arpan Tahim, Zaid Sadiq
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Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
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Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
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Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
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Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2018Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Volume 56, Issue 10Author(s): Dominic Lamont, Mark Cairns, Peter Bujtar, Andrew Carton
Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2018Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Volume 56, Issue 10Author(s): Aysha Nijamudeen, Mhairi Little, Michael Nugent, Valerie Bryant
Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
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