High-flavonoid foods, like berries and apples, 'prevent weight gain'

ConclusionThis study found that people who ate more flavonoids, specifically anthocyanins (coming mainly from blueberries and strawberries), flavonoid polymers (from tea and apples), and flavonols (from tea and onions), gained less weight than those consuming less over a 24-year period. Every extra 10mg of anthocyanins, 138mg of flavonoid polymers, and 7mg of flavonols was linked to 70-100g less weight gained over four-year intervals. This isn’t a lot, but adds up over the years.Readers should be aware that cohort studies like this can find associations between consumption of certain food ingredients (like flavonoids) with weight gain or other health benefits, but they cannot prove that by increasing your consumption of flavonoids you will put on less weight. A study where you randomly assign people a diet high in flavonoids for a long period of time would be needed to test this, and may not be the most practical to implement. However, the results are consistent with general public health advice to eat lots of fruit and vegetables. Most people in the UK don’t eat the recommended minimum of five portions of fruit or vegetables per day, so you may benefit from eating more and a larger variety.The study was large and long term – both big strengths, thereby increasing the reliability of the findings. However, no study is perfect and the study authors pointed out the major limitations of their work. Firstly, the accuracy of estimates of flavonoid content can be affected by...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Obesity Source Type: news