Oral Propranolol Best for Reducing Infantile HemangiomaOral Propranolol Best for Reducing Infantile Hemangioma

Oral propranolol had a 95% clearance rate vs 43% for oral corticosteroids, according to a meta-analysis. Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Pediatrics Headlines - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

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Conclusions: Surgical procedures for IH have decreased by about 90% at our institution since the introduction of propranolol treatment and hepatic IH have not needed liver transplantation. Referrals for surgery for IH are generally the consequence of absent or delayed propranolol treatment. Given the significant reduction in the number of surgical procedures, propranolol can be considered as having a strong economic and social impact.What is Known:•The use of oral propranolol solution is currently considered as the treatment of choice in the management of infantile hemangiomas.•Propranolol treatment achieves bett...
Source: European Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
Abstract Infantile hemangiomas are the most common childhood vascular tumors. Propranolol is a β-adrenergic blocker that has proven effective in the treatment of this tumor. Numerous studies around the world have been published, describing satisfactory responses in pediatric populations with a higher cure rate and fewer adverse effects than when using corticosteroids. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of propranolol in Moroccan pediatric patients diagnosed with infantile hemangioma who were treated with oral propranolol. A prospective study was conducted from May 2009 to M...
Source: Archives de Pediatrie - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Arch Pediatr Source Type: research
There has been a paradigm shift from corticosteroid to propranolol treatment for infantile hemangiomas (IHs), with surgical resection reserved for complicated or persistent IHs. The purpose of this study was to determine if propranolol treatment was associated with decreased utilization of surgical resection compared to corticosteroids.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Treatment of hemangioma depends on the location and size of the lesion; however, it is generally accomplished with surgical removal, sclerotic agents, intralesional corticosteroid application, embolization, radiotherapy, laser or alfa interferon application. Cryosurgery can offer advantages over other methods, as it is a simple, painless, bleeding-free, and rapid technique as compared to traditional surgery. A 42-year-old woman was referred with the chief complaint of a reddish, asymptomatic nodule in the lower lip, of approximately 1-year duration, measuring around 1  cm.
Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Source Type: research
This article illustrates a patient who has had multiple episodes of reproliferation of subglottic hemangioma after weaning from propranolol therapy. PMID: 29706817 [PubMed]
Source: Baylor University Medical Center Proceedings - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent) Source Type: research
Infantile hemangiomas are benign vascular endothelial neoplasms characterized by a bright red surface and occur in up to 4% of children by the age of 1 year. They are usually small at the time of birth and enlarge rapidly during the first few months of the newborn's life, eventually shrinking slowly over time.1,2 Therapeutic options include corticosteroids, pulse dye laser, topical imiquimod, beta blockers, and surgery, with recent emphasis on corticosteroids and beta blockers. The efficacy of propranolol, a non-selective beta blocker, in the treatment of infantile hemangiomas has been
Source: Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Source Type: research
Infantile hemangiomas are the most common vascular tumor of infancy and childhood. Sometimes these lesions interfere with normal function&produce serious disfigurement that is unlikely to resolve on its own and then treatment is required. While evidence most supports the use of corticosteroids, there is no well- studied or Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approved systemic therapy for haemangiomas of Infancy. Dramatic improvement of complicated haemangioma by propranolol has recently been reported, but to date, details for initiating therapy, monitoring and potential risks in relation to Corticosteroids were not compa...
Source: Bangladesh Medical Research Council Bulletin - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
ConclusionOrally administered propranolol as monotherapy or in combination with other therapeutic modalities may play a key role in the treatment of Kasabach –Merritt syndrome.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Infantile hemangiomas are benign vascular endothelial neoplasms characterized by a bright red surface and occur in up to 4% of children by the age of 1 year. They are usually small at the time of birth and enlarge rapidly during the first few months of the newborn's life, eventually shrinking slowly over time.1,2 Therapeutic options include corticosteroids, pulse dye laser, topical imiquimod, beta blockers, and surgery, with recent emphasis on corticosteroids and beta blockers. The efficacy of propranolol, a non-selective beta blocker, in the treatment of infantile hemangiomas has been
Source: Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsPropranolol is efficacious for treating subglottic hemangiomas. Rebound growth does occur in a small subset of patients during the propranolol wean. Close observation for children during weaning of propranolol therapy for subglottic hemangioma is essential. Adjunctive management strategies need to be used in patients with rebound growth. Laryngoscope, 2017
Source: The Laryngoscope - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Pediatrics Source Type: research
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