Epigenetic inactivation of FAT4 contributes to gastric field cancerization

Conclusions FAT4 was methylation-silenced in GCs. Its methylation in gastric mucosae was associated with H. pylori infection and likely contributed to epigenetic field cancerization.
Source: Gastric Cancer - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

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Abstract From the literature review, there seem to be no studies conducted on infection caused by Helicobacter pylori in patients with gastric MALT lymphoma in the KSA region. The present research is an attempt to understand the prevalence of patients infected with H. pylori in the selected region and the role of allelic imbalance of chromosome 3p regions to understand the clinical manifestations and features associated with MALT lymphomagenesis. The researcher analyzed the frequency of infection in patients from the region of Saudi Arabia by examining the data collected from hospitals and biopsy tissue samples as...
Source: Molecular Biology Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Mol Biol Rep Source Type: research
AbstractInfection withHelicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is associated with an increased risk of gastric malignant lymphoma. The chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa byH.pylori infection induces lymphomagenesis. Although this chronic mucosal inflammation also results in atrophic gastritis, evidence supporting the possible significance of atrophic gastritis in gastric lymphomagenesis is scarce. Here, to evaluate the association between gastric mucosal atrophy and the risk of gastric lymphoma, we conducted a matched case-control study at Aichi Cancer Center focusing on the attribution ofH.pylori infection status and pepsinogen...
Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
Authors: Reyes VE, Peniche AG Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a prevalent human pathogen that successfully establishes chronic infection, which leads to clinically significant gastric diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease (PUD), and gastric cancer (GC). H. pylori is able to produce a persistent infection due in large part to its ability to hijack the host immune response. The host adaptive immune response is activated to strategically and specifically attack pathogens and normally clears them from the infected host. Since B and T lymphocytes are central mediators of adaptive immunity, in this c...
Source: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology - Category: Microbiology Tags: Curr Top Microbiol Immunol Source Type: research
Authors: Ying L, Ferrero RL Abstract The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori interacts intimately with gastric epithelial cells to induce inflammatory responses that are a hallmark of the infection. This inflammation is a critical precursor to the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. A major driver of this inflammation is a type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI), present in a subpopulation of more virulent H. pylori strains. The cagPAI T4SS specifically activates signalling pathways in gastric epithelial cells that converge on the transcription factor, nuc...
Source: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology - Category: Microbiology Tags: Curr Top Microbiol Immunol Source Type: research
Authors: Sokolova O, Naumann M Abstract Over the last years, intensive investigations in molecular biology and cell physiology extended tremendously the knowledge about the association of inflammation and cancer. In frame of this paradigm, the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori triggers gastritis and gastric ulcer disease, and contributes to the development of gastric cancer. Mechanisms, by which the bacteria-induced inflammation in gastric mucosa leads to intestinal metaplasia and carcinoma, are represented in this review. An altered cell-signaling response and increased production of free radicals by epithelial a...
Source: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology - Category: Microbiology Tags: Curr Top Microbiol Immunol Source Type: research
Authors: Rudnicka K, Backert S, Chmiela M Abstract Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with the development of a chronic inflammatory response, which may induce peptic ulcers, gastric cancer (GC), and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Chronic H. pylori infection promotes the genetic instability of gastric epithelial cells and interferes with the DNA repair systems in host cells. Colonization of the stomach with H. pylori is an important cause of non-cardia GC and gastric MALT lymphoma. The reduction of GC development in patients who underwent anti-H. pylori eradication schemes has also been...
Source: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology - Category: Microbiology Tags: Curr Top Microbiol Immunol Source Type: research
Authors: Jung HJ, Hong SJ, Kim SH Abstract Background/Aims: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process, wherein the epithelial cells show reduced intercellular adhesions and acquire migratory fibroblastic properties. EMT is associated with downregulation in epithelial marker expression, abnormal translocation of E-cadherin, and upregulation in mesenchymal marker expression. Here, we investigated the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of EMT markers in early gastric cancer (EGC) between cancer and noncancer tissues. Methods: Tissue samples were prospectively obtained from 19 patients wi...
Source: Clinical Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Clin Endosc Source Type: research
Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of specific bacterial virulence factors can significantly contribute to antibacterial drug discovery. Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium that infects almost half of the world's population, leading to gastric disorders and even gastric cancer. H. pylori expresses a series of virulence factors in the host, among which high-temperature requirement A (HpHtrA) is a newly identified serine protease secreted by H. pylori. HpHtrA cleaves the extracellular domain of the epithelial cell surface adhesion protein E-cadherin and disrupts gastric epithelial cell junctio...
Source: Journal of Biological Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Protein Structure and Folding Source Type: research
Inflammatory responses induced by Helicobacter pylori on the carcinogenesis of gastric epithelial GES‑1 cells. Int J Oncol. 2019 Jun;54(6):2200-2210 Authors: Wang J, Yao Y, Zhang Q, Li S, Tang L Abstract Helicobacter pylori (HP) is a pathogenic bacterium associated with chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer. In the present study, the primary carcinogenesis process of normal gastric epithelial cells (GES‑1) infected with HP was investigated. It was determined that infected gastric mucosal epithelial GES‑1 cells secreted increased interleukin‑8 (IL‑8) and IL‑23, and e...
Source: International Journal of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Int J Oncol Source Type: research
by Connie Fung, Shumin Tan, Mifuyu Nakajima, Emma C. Skoog, Luis Fernando Camarillo-Guerrero, Jessica A. Klein, Trevor D. Lawley, Jay V. Solnick, Tadashi Fukami, Manuel R. Amieva Lifelong infection of the gastric mucosa byHelicobacter pylori can lead to peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. However, how the bacteria maintain chronic colonization in the face of constant mucus and epithelial cell turnover in the stomach is unclear. Here, we present a new model of howH.pylori establish and persist in stomach, which involves the colonization of a specialized microenvironment, or microniche, deep in the gastric glands. Using quant...
Source: PLoS Biology: Archived Table of Contents - Category: Biology Authors: Source Type: research
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