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C-section rates: Consider this when deciding where to have your baby

For many years, there has been criticism that the rates of cesarean births are too high because higher rates have not resulted in improvements in maternal or child health. Many expectant moms feel strongly about having a natural vaginal birth, and want to do all they can to avoid a cesarean section. But for some, a C-section may seem like a good option for a range of reasons. And for others, a cesarean may be essential to protect the health — or life — of mom and baby. In parts of the world where C-sections are not readily available, complications of vaginal birth often lead to serious consequences, including loss of life for mother and baby. In contrast, quick access to cesareans has its own problems. Over all, cesarean delivery is a very safe procedure. But it carries higher risks than vaginal delivery, including a three-fold higher rate of infection, hemorrhage, and organ damage. It also has a longer recovery period. So how many cesareans we’re doing is a number worth paying attention to. Finding the optimal C-section rate As it turns out, there is a sweet spot — a certain “rate” of cesareans needed to prevent the terrible suffering and aftermath that can occur when a baby can’t move though the birth canal, or when there’s an emergency requiring immediate delivery. Recently, a study from researchers at Harvard Medical School and the Stanford University School of Medicine found that the ideal rate of childbirth by C-section ap...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Family Planning and Pregnancy Health Women's Health c-section cesarean section Source Type: news

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Abstract The goal of this editorial is to equip readers with opioid education resources that enable you to role model what it looks like to speak out about addiction. How are we doing as a profession speaking up about addiction? Stigma is commanded by a deep irony: where peer pressure is what likely keeps us quiet, peer support is what enables us to speak up. The "#MeToo" movement is an extraordinary example of the inertia needed to break open a taboo topic. From Hollywood celebrities to US women's gymnastics stars, it was clear that as more women spoke up about sexual harassment, well, the more women sp...
Source: American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Am J Health Promot Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Our systematic review identified factors that might help improve the fidelity and acceptability of PYD interventions. Addressing these might enable PYD to fulfill its potential as a means of promoting health. PMID: 29667497 [PubMed - in process]
Source: American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Am J Health Promot Source Type: research
This report presents baseline estimates of the use of these preventive services before the publication of QFP that can be used to monitor progress toward improving the quality of preventive care received by women and men of reproductive age. PERIOD COVERED: 2011-2013. DESCRIPTION OF THE SYSTEM: Three surveillance systems were used to document receipt of preventive health services among women and men of reproductive age as recommended in QFP. The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) collects data on factors that influence reproductive health in the United States since 1973, with a focus on fertility, sexual act...
Source: MMWR Surveill Summ - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Surveill Summ Source Type: research
AbstractSTUDY QUESTIONWhat is the impact of preconception lifestyle interventions on live birth, birth weight and pregnancy rate?SUMMARY ANSWERLifestyle interventions showed benefits for weight loss and increased natural pregnancy rate, but not for live birth or birth weight.WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADYEvidence on the practice and content of preconception counseling and interventions is variable and limited.STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATIONSystematic review and meta-analysis (MA). Main search terms were those related to preconception lifestyle. Database searched were Ovid MEDLINE(R), EBM Reviews, PsycINFO, EMBASE and CINAHL Plus. No l...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusion: Prenatal urinary BPA concentration was associated with some aspects of child behavior in this cohort, and some associations were stronger among boys. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP984 Received: 18 August 2016 Revised: 09 December 2016 Accepted: 12 December 2016 Published: 16 June 2017 Address correspondence to Joseph M. Braun, Department of Epidemiology, Box G-S121-2, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 USA. Telephone: (401) 863-5397. E-mail: joseph_braun_1@brown.edu Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP984). The authors declare they have no actual or potential competing fi...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
DiscussionPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 6-8% of reproductive-age women making it the most common endocrinopathy in this age group. There is no consensus on the specific diagnostic criteria for PCOS in adolescents as many of the characteristics overlap with normal adolescent physiology. However, patients should have evidence of hyperandrogenism, oligo- or amenorrhea, and potentially polycystic ovaries. PCOS has a genetic component although a specific gene has not been identified. Incidence of PCOS is 20-40% for a woman with a family history. Hyperandrogenism Androgen levels change during puberty therefore actual ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Infertility is often viewed as a woman's problem but when a couple has trouble conceiving, there's a good chance it's related to male factors -- in fact, that's the case 40-50 percent of the time. That's why the male partner should be part of any couple's fertility assessment. Not only is male infertility more common than most people realize, male factors are the sole reason for a couple's inability to have a baby 15 percent to 25 percent of the time. While some reasons for male infertility are well understood, at least 50 percent of problems are due to unknown factors. Male infertility can occur when men have a less t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
STUDY QUESTION By investigating a birth cohort with a high ongoing participation rate to derive an unbiased population, what are the parameters and influences upon testicular function for a population not selected with regard to fertility? SUMMARY ANSWER While varicocele, cryptorchidism and obesity may impact on human testicular function, most common drug exposures and the presence of epididymal cysts appear to have no or minimal adverse impact. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The majority of previous attempts to develop valid reference populations for spermatogenesis have relied on potentially biased sources such as recruits from...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Andrology Source Type: research
Have you been trying to get pregnant with no success? I've been there. You are not alone. Infertility affects more and more couples each year. According to the Centers for Disease Control, as of 2010 about 6.7 million American women suffer from infertility. Infertility is defined as as the inability to conceive after one year of well-timed, unprotected intercourse (or after six months if the woman is over 35) or the inability to carry a viable pregnancy to live birth. It's important to remember that having infertility isn't just about not being able to conceive, but it also represents the inability to stay pregnant as we...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
There many Factors of Infertility. 1. bleed extremely heavily or lightly 2. either underweight or overweight 3. three successive miscarriages 4. you or your partner have any chronic illnesses, like diabetes, thyroid problems, or hypertension 5. you or your partner smoke or drink alcohol : smoking and drinking while trying to get pregnant is also a problem. 6. you or your partner have a history of STDs
Source: Cystic Fibrosis Pregnancy Forum - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Pregnancy Source Type: forums
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