UCLA scientists test new strategy that could help fight ovarian cancer

UCLA scientists have developed a promising novel method to treat gynecologic tumors. The approach focuses on a protein called p53, which is commonly mutated in women who have high-grade serous ovarian cancer, the deadliest form of reproductive cancer. In many women with the disease, the cancer is very advanced by the time it is diagnosed and is therefore difficult to treat. The discovery was the result of a three-year study co-led by David Eisenberg and Dr. Sanaz Memarzadeh, members of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. The findings, which were published online in the journal Cancer Cell, could ultimately lead to new targeted therapies for many other types of cancer carrying similar p53 mutations. P53 is known as the “guardian of the genome.” It prevents damaged cells from reproducing by stopping their growth until the damage is repaired or, if the damage cannot be reversed, promotes cell death. But mutations, which are found in 96 percent of patients with high-grade serous ovarian tumors, can cause p53 to form clumps, or “aggregates,” which impair the protein’s normal function. As a result, the damaged cells are able to multiply uncontrollably, which can lead to cancer. The UCLA scientists developed and tested a peptide called ReACp53, which penetrates cancer cells and prevents mutated p53 from clumping together. The technique restores normal p53 function, causing death of the ovarian cancer cells. “Our lab has worked for 15 yea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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Discussion MDSCs violently emerge in pathological conditions in an attempt to limit potentially harmful immune and inflammatory responses. Mechanisms supporting their expansion and survival are deeply investigated in cancer, in the perspective to reactivate specific antitumor responses and prevent their contribution to disease evolution. These findings will likely contribute to improve the targeting of MDSCs in anticancer immunotherapies, either alone or in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors. New evidence indicates that the expansion of myeloid cell differentiation in pathology is subject to fine-tuning, as its...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Xuequn Xu†, J. N. Rashida Gnanaprakasam†, John Sherman† and Ruoning Wang* Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, Hematology/Oncology &BMT, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States The adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) through genetic engineering is one of the most promising new therapies for treating cancer patients. A robust CAR T cell-mediated anti-tumor response requires the coordination of nutrient and energy supplies with CAR T cell expansion and function. Howe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusion Several TISC-based immunotherapeutic approaches are under development in various stages of preclinical studies. As outlined in this review article, a careful and more exhaustive genetic and metabolic understanding of TISC-associated phenotypes is critical to develop novel TISC based immunotherapies. Various components within the tumor microenvironment such as tumor cells, infiltrating immune cells, and supporting stromal cells impact the TISC metabolism. This unique metabolic profile leads to upregulation of certain enzymes and proteins such as ALDH1, CEP55, IDO COA1 etc., which can be utilized for development ...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Discussion Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 is an essential molecule for maintaining immune homeostasis and subverting inflammation. Disorders arising from excess inflammation or SOCS1 deficiency can be potentially treated with SOCS1 mimetics (Ahmed et al., 2015). While SOCS1 has promising potential in many disorders, it should be noted that new targets and actions of SOCS1 are still being discovered and not all the effects of this protein are beneficial in autoimmune diseases and cancer. For instance, SOCS1 degrades IRS1 and IRS2, required for insulin signaling, via the SOCS Box domain, thus, limiting its potential in ...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
We examined the following three conditions: DMEM high glucose which contained 4.5 mg/ml glucose, independent of serum, DMEM low glucose which contained 1.0 mg/ml glucose, independent of serum. And, DMEM no glucose which contained 0.0 mg/ml glucose, independent of serum. DMEM is referred to as glucose “free,” however some glucose was actually present due to the FBS. The glucose concentration in the FBS used was 1.04 mg/ml. We calculate 0.0937 mg/ml glucose was present in the media under all conditions due to the addition of serum. Quantification of ROS Levels ROS are widely evaluated in tissue culture using di...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Abstract BMI-1 (B-lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1) is a key protein partner in polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) that helps in maintaining the integrity of the complex. It is also a key player in ubiquitination of histone H2A which affects gene expression pattern involved in various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, growth, DNA repair, apoptosis and senescence. In many cancers, Overexpression of BMI1correlates with advanced stages of disease, aggressive clinicopathological behavior, poor prognosis resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. BMI1 is emerging as a key player in EMT, chemo-resistance...
Source: Gene - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Gene Source Type: research
Scientists at the Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center (VIC) at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel, two-agent immunotherapy combination that worked surprisingly well in animal models with malignant mesothelioma. The discovery has sparked new optimism for immunotherapy, which has struggled to provide consistently positive results with aggressive cancers such as mesothelioma. “This is the beginning of a new story of hope, a new combination of immunotherapy,” Dr. Mark Poznansky, director of the VIC and associate professor at Harvard Medical School, told Asbestos.com. “It worked quite well in a...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Discussion of advocacy for the cause is a usual feature of our community, as we try things and attempt to make progress in persuading the world that rejuvenation research is plausible, practical, and necessary. There are more people engaged in advocacy now than at any time in the past decade, and so discussions of strategy come up often. New ventures kicked off in 2017 include the Geroscience online magazine, and among the existing ventures the LEAF / Lifespan.io volunteers seem to be hitting their stride. The mainstream media continues to be as much a hindrance as a help, and where it is a help you will usually find Aubre...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Consequently, a global analysis of patient 5-hmC levels should be included in future clinical trials, which use pretreatment with epigenetic adjuvants to elevate 5-hmC levels and improve the efficacy of current chemotherapies. Identifying prognostic epigenetic markers and altering chemotherapeutic regimens to incorporate DNMTi pretreatment in tumors with low 5-hmC levels could have important clinical implications for newly diagnosed HGSOC disease. PMID: 29263182 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Cancer Res Source Type: research
The standard approach to treating patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) after primary debulking surgery remains taxane and platinum-based chemotherapy. Despite treatment with this strategy, the vast majority of patients relapse and develop drug-resistant metastatic disease that may be driven by cancer stem cells (CSCs) or cancer initiating cells (CICs). Oncolytic viruses circumvent typical drug-resistance mechanisms, therefore they may provide a safe and effective alternative treatment for chemotherapy-resistant CSCs/CICs. Among oncolytic viruses vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has demonstrated oncolysis ...
Source: Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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