Rethinking the No. 1 New Year's Resolution

According to a 2014 Marist poll, more than four in 10 Americans expected to make a New Year's resolution for 2015. Guess which promise topped the list? Weight loss. Guess how many kept their promise? "Only 59 percent kept their word, down from 72 percent the previous year." I, too, might have been a member of the failed 41 percent -- except this year I decided to do things differently. I fought the temptation to make a list of resolutions. Instead, I decided to go with the flow of my body. No, I didn't lose weight this year, but I did make significant dietary changes. I consider this a major victory. In fact, I'm seeing 2015 as a foundational year for more exciting dietary changes to come in 2016. And I'll be letting my body take the lead. Most of us take a top down approach to weight loss. The mind decides it wants to lose weight and how much, and the body usually resists. It's actually an exciting spiritual journey to let your body do the talking. It's an exercise in self-trust and self-discovery. Is a brownie just a brownie or a sign of loneliness? Once you go down this road, you can't go back to eating unconsciously. This year my body told me to give up potato chips and Diet Coke. I also reduced my coffee intake to one cup a day and drastically reduced my use of artificial sweeteners and margarine. That may not sound like a lot, but giving them up was a big deal. I wasn't sure I could do it, but my body gave me a boost. It wasn't hard at all. On the other hand,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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  Cannabis, weed, marijuana, pot. It goes by several names, but we all know what it smells like. As weed becomes more mainstream, we on the Not Crazy podcast want to know: Is marijuana really an effective treatment for anxiety? Is it just a coping mechanism? Or a vice? In today’s podcast, Gabe and Jackie look at the research and weigh out the evidence. They also interview Eileen Davidson, a rheumatoid arthritis patient who regularly uses marijuana as a medicine to see what she has to say. What’s your take? Tune in for an open-minded discussion about weed. (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE &REV...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Medications Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
Lately, I’ve been hearing a lot from patients and friends who are enthusiastically pursuing a “whole body cleanse” or “colon cleanse,” or a “detoxification cleanse.” And I’ve seen ads about these cleanses promising a number of health benefits, based on the general principle that every so often it’s a good idea to rid yourself of toxins that are undoubtedly accumulating within you. Spring cleaning for your body? The idea goes back centuries. And sure, cleansing — or cleaning — is clear enough for bathing or mopping a floor. But how does a cleanse work in the ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Angelicae Pubescentis Radix (APR) is a widely used antirheumatic Chinese medicinal herb known as “Duhuo” in China. It has the effects of dispelling wind and removing dampness, diffusing impediment, and relieving pain, and is mainly indicated for rheumatic arthritis with pain in the lower back and knees, and headache. To the best of our knowledge, an attempt is made to provide an up-to-date review on these aspects based on published materials, including ancient and modern books; Master's and doctoral theses; monographs on medicinal plants; the pharmacopoeia of different countries, websites for publication of pat...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Musculoskeletal disorders and symptoms occur frequently. The burden of complaints and diagnoses is comparable to previous population-based surveys. PMID: 32189044 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Bundesgesundheitsblatt, Gesundheitsforschung, Gesundheitsschutz - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz Source Type: research
Several reports in the literature have identified an association between cortisol levels and the presence of chronic pain in conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, low back pain or whiplash. In contrast, few have examined the association of cortisol and pain in people with osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this systematic review was to verify the association between cortisol and pain in the OA population.
Source: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsThese preliminary results demonstrate that UPLC-TQ-MS analysis method is a powerful tool to identify metabolite profiles of AS. Research in identified disease activity –associated metabolites and biological pathways may provide assistance for clinical diagnosis and pathological mechanism of AS.Key Points• There are perturbations of serum amino acid metabolism in AS, compared with RA and healthy controls, determined by UPLC-TQ-MS.• Metabolomics pathway is used to analysis for the differential metabolites of AS.• The altered serum amino acid could monitor disease activity of AS.
Source: Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Authors: Abstract Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives highlights articles selected to fit today's topics and times.In this month's article, from the May...
Source: The American Journal of Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Am J Nurs Source Type: research
Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives highlights articles selected to fit today's topics and times. In this month's article, from the May 1925 issue, nurse Ellen G...
Source: AJN - Category: Nursing Tags: From the AJN Archives: PDF Only Source Type: research
AbstractBakker et al found a change in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 29 of 188 patients, when the examination was repeated at three months and at one year (1). The patients were all being investigated on account of back pain, with presumably varying degrees of concern about the possibility of inflammatory spondyloarthritis.Twelve (6.8%) patients were negative at the initial examination but became positive on subsequent testing. A percentage that was lower, but not dissimilar to Van Onna et al's report of 15% at two years (2).
Source: Arthritis and Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: LETTER TO THE EDITOR Source Type: research
ATLANTA—The potential of cannabis‐based medicines is a hot topic, particularly as pain management therapy for arthritis and other conditions. However, confusion abounds regarding its therapeutic potential, how it can be administered and even the correct terminology to use. David P. Finn, PhD, professor of pharma­cology and therapeutics, and founding co-director of the Centre for Pain... [Read More]
Source: The Rheumatologist - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting Conditions Spondyloarthritis Axial Spondyloarthritis chronic low-back pain HLA-B27 Source Type: research
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