FDA uses 'animal' rule to approve anthrax vaccine for humans ... You're just an experimental animal to the vaccine industry

(NaturalNews) The FDA has dramatically expanded the permitted uses of the anthrax vaccine using a post-9/11 law known as the Bioterrorism Act of 2002. A clause of that act, known as the Animal Rule, allows the FDA to bypass human studies of drugs in cases where exposing humans to...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: ELP chimeric antigen could be considered as a high immunogenic antigen. PMID: 30621469 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol Source Type: research
Scientists engineered a vaccine that protects animals from both anthrax and plague. After more development and testing, the approach could be used to combat public health threats.
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Shigella dysenteriae causing shigellosis is one of the diseases that threaten the health of human society in the developing countries. In Shigella, IpaD gene is one of the key pathogenic genes causing strong mucosal immune system reactions. Anthrax disease is caused by Bacillus anthracis. PA protective antigen is one of the subunits in anthrax toxin complex responsible for the transfer of other subunits into the cytosol of host cells. The 20 kDa subunit of PA (PA20) has the property of immunogenicity. CTxB or B subunit of Vibrio cholerae toxin (CT) is a non-toxic protein and has the function to trans...
Source: Molecular Biology Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Mol Biol Rep Source Type: research
Anthrax, plague and tularemia are three potent agents terrorists would be likely to use in an attack, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each is highly and quickly lethal to humans. But there are no licensed vaccines for tularemia and plague, and although there is an anthrax vaccine, it requires a burdensome immunization schedule and has severe side effects.Now, a UCLA-led group of researchers may have found a solution that, if found to be safe and effective in humans, could protect people from all three bacteria. The team used molecular engineering to develop vaccines against each that use a comm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
by Ian T. Kracalik, Ernest Kenu, Evans Nsoh Ayamdooh, Emmanuel Allegye-Cudjoe, Paul Nokuma Polkuu, Joseph Asamoah Frimpong, Kofi Mensah Nyarko, William A. Bower, Rita Traxler, Jason K. Blackburn Anthrax is hyper-endemic in West Africa. Despite the effectiveness of livestock vaccines in controlling anthrax, underreporting, logistics, and limited resources makes implementing vaccination campaigns difficult. To better understand the geographic limits of anthrax, elucidate environmental facto rs related to its occurrence, and identify human and livestock populations at risk, we developed predictive models of the environmental...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Anthrax is a widely spread zoonotic disease found on nearly every continent. To control the disease in humans and animals, annual livestock vaccination is recommended. However, in 2007, the country of Georgia ended its policy of compulsory annual livestock anthrax vaccination. Our objective was to assess how the epidemiology of human anthrax has evolved from 2000-2013 in Georgia, in the wake of this cessation. We used passive surveillance data on epidemiological surveys of human anthrax case patients. Risk factors and rates of self-reported sources of infection were compared, before and after the change i...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Dibyendu Banerjee, Baishali Chakraborty, Banya ChakrabortyIndian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(5):456-458 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has classified all the emerging infectious diseases agents under three categories. Among Category A priority pathogens comes Bacillus anthracis –the causative agent of Anthrax. It is a gram positive spore bearing bacteria, and the disease is typically associated with grazing animals, and affects the people as a zoonosis. The disease can be classically transmitted by three routes namely: cutaneous, gastrointestinal and pulmonary, with a fourth route recently ...
Source: Indian Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
This study suggests that the passive mouse protection model could be potentially used to evaluate the protective immune response in livestock animals vaccinated with the current live vaccine and new vaccines.
Source: Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Abstract The anthrax vaccine candidate AV7909 is being developed as a next generation vaccine for a post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) indication against anthrax. AV7909 consists of the Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA, BioThrax®) bulk drug substance adjuvanted with the immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) compound, CPG 7909. The addition of CPG 7909 to AVA enhances both the magnitude and the kinetics of antibody responses in animals and human subjects, making AV7909 a suitable next-generation vaccine for use in a PEP setting. The studies described here provide initial information on AV7909-induced toxin-neu...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Bacillus (B.) anthracis, the causal agent of anthrax, is effectively controlled by the Sterne live spore vaccine (34F2) in animals. However, live spore vaccines are not suitable for si...
Source: BMC Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Source Type: research
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