Infertile Men May Have Higher Risk of Heart Disease, Diabetes

Doctors should look for underlying health problems, experts suggest Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Diabetes, Heart Diseases, Male Infertility
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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It continues to happen: I run into people who say to me “I follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle. I eat gluten-free!” When I ask them what that means, they tell me that they only eat gluten-free bread, pasta, pizza, cookies, etc. I’m not entirely sure why this misinterpretation of the Wheat Belly message is so common. Let’s talk about this important distinction, as being gluten-free can be an absolute health and weight disaster, unlike the magnificent health and weight loss we enjoy on the Wheat Belly lifestyle when done right. It’s perfectly fine to be gluten-free, i.e., avoiding wheat, rye, and b...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates autoimmune blood sugar gluten gluten-free grain grain-free grains Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Heat stimulation by M-RF treatment induced upregulation of UCP1 and FGF21 expression in serum and/or WATs, which was correlated with reduced total body and WAT weight gain in DIO mice. PMID: 30275865 [PubMed]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Most mainstream doctors believe that polycystic ovary syndrome, PCOS, is a disease. PCOS is, after all, associated with markedly increased risk for type 2 diabetes, hypertension, endometrial cancer, and heart disease, in addition to outward signs that include excessive facial and body hair, tendency to being overweight or obese, irregular menstrual cycles, infertility. A crisis of self esteem commonly and understandably results. Mainstream doctors tell you to not worry because they have plenty of prescription drugs to “treat” it, not to mention various hormones, fertility procedures, and gastric bypass. PCOS is...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates acne facial change facial hair gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation pcos polycystic ovary testosterone undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in adult women (1). It can't be cured, but thanks to many years of fruitful research and intensive investigation, multiple modalities to help manage the condition throughout a woman's lifetime have emerged. Those of us who have been in practice for more than a decade or two have likely had the experience of managing mothers and daughters with the condition. Many of us have supported our PCOS patients through an adolescence complicated by acne and hair growth, an early adulthood complicated by infertility and irregular menses, and late reproductive age compl...
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
Men who have low sperm counts are at a 20 percent greater risk of developing illnesses like diabetes and heart disease, according to an Italian study linking infertility to metabolic syndrome symptoms.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(University of California - San Diego) Women who have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common hormone condition that contributes to infertility and metabolic problems, such as diabetes and heart disease, tend to have less diverse gut bacteria than women who do not have the condition, according to researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with colleagues at Poznan University of Medical Sciences in Poland and San Diego State University.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a highly inheritable complex genetic trait and one of the most prevalent endocrine-metabolic-reproductive disorders of humans, clinically evident in 10% –15% of reproductive-age women. It is the single most common cause of ovulatory infertility in women and of subfertility overall in Western societies. Fundamentally, most patients with PCOS, particularly those with hyperandrogenic phenotypes, also demonstrate underlying metabolic dysfunction and s ubclinical chronic inflammation, leading to insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
Our ancestors thrived on eating fish fresh from the ocean. After all, fish is a pure source of protein and healthy omega-3 fats. But our modern fish supply is vastly different than anything our ancestors ate. As our oceans have become more and more polluted, so has our seafood. In fact, the fish on your dinner plate today is likely loaded with plastic trash. Let me explain… Every year, billions of pounds of plastic waste pour into our oceans and rivers. I’m talking about things like grocery bags, drinking straws, water bottles and more. It’s now estimated that up to 51 trillion pieces of plastic c...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Health Nutrition dinner estrogen fat fish plastic testosterone thyroid function toxins weight Source Type: news
Summary S‪tudies have suggested an association between varicocele, hypogonadism, and elevated oxidative stress markers, but no other health risks have been associated with varicoceles. ‬‬‬‬We sought to determine the association between varicocele and incident medical comorbidities. ‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬Using the Truven Health MarketScan® claims database from 2001 to 2009, we identified 4459 men with varicoceles, and 100,066 controls based on ICD‐9 and CPT codes, with an average follow‐up of 3....
Source: Andrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Authors: Liu K, Motan T, Claman P Abstract OBJECTIVES: To review the etiology, evaluation, and treatment of hirsutism. EVALUATION: A thorough history and physical examination plus selected laboratory evaluations will confirm the diagnosis and direct treatment. TREATMENT: Pharmacologic interventions can suppress ovarian or adrenal androgen production and block androgen receptors in the hair follicle. Hair removal methods and lifestyle modifications may improve or hasten the therapeutic response. OUTCOMES: At least 6 to 9 months of therapy are required to produce improvement in hirsutism. EVIDENCE: Th...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
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