World Briefing: Iran: Deadly Swine Flu Outbreak Is Likely to Spread, Official Warns

At least 33 people have died from a swine flu virus outbreak in two provinces of southwestern Iran in the past three weeks.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Epidemics Iran Swine Influenza Source Type: news

Related Links:

We refer transmission of infections in India which have implications for Pakistan [1]. As compared to Pakistan, the range and burden of infectious diseases are enormous in India including Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) contagion in 2002 –2003, Influenza A virus epidemic of 2006 (avian influenza), 2007 Equine influenza, Swine flu pandemic outbreaks in 2009 and 2014 [2]. Moreover, episodes of infectious diseases continue to rise in India, with a recent surge of chikungunya and dengue cases in 2016 [1].
Source: Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion This study has identified a substance in the mucus secreted by a south Indian frog which can kill certain types of flu virus. Researchers often turn to natural substances with known health-giving properties to find potential new drugs for humans. For example, aspirin was developed based on a compound found in willow bark – which had been used in traditional medicine for hundreds of years. Some other drugs – such as some chemotherapy and anticlotting drugs – have also been developed from chemicals found in plants. By isolating the substances that have an effect the researchers can make sure...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Medical practice Source Type: news
Conclusion This modelling study shows how the strains of influenza A – "bird flu" – circulating when a person is born give them lifelong protection against new subtypes with the same H protein groups. The researchers call this immune imprinting. This may help to explain the high severity and mortality rate seen among certain groups. For example, the massive flu pandemic of 1918 was an H1N1 strain. This had a very high fatality rate among young adults, which the researchers consider may have been because when they were born (between 1880 and 1900), H3 was the dominant strain. Therefore they had no prot...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news
by Charlie Cador, Nicolas Rose, Lander Willem, Mathieu Andraud Swine Influenza A Viruses (swIAVs) have been shown to persist in farrow-to-finish pig herds with repeated outbreaks in successive batches, increasing the risk for respiratory disorders in affected animals and being a threat for public health. Although the general routes of swIAV transmission (i.e. direct contact and exposure to aerosols) were clearly identified, the transmission process between batches is still not fully understood. Maternally derived antibodies (MDAs) were stressed as a possible factor favoring within-herd swIAV persistence. However, the rela...
Source: PLoS One - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
The Zika virus attracted many headlines this winter, but a recent admission by the chief medical officer at a leading vaccine manufacturer -- that the world is ill-prepared to deal with pandemic outbreaks -- underscores a fundamental problem. To ensure safety and efficacy, the federal government's regulatory approval process for new vaccines may extend development timelines for years. So when The New York Times reports that "eighteen organizations are working on developing a vaccine for the Zika virus," it is likely that those companies will labor for a very long time. Vaccinations rightly require stri...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Abstract: History provides us several illustrations where epidemic outbreaks have led to biological disasters. Accidental or deliberate release of harmful micro-organisms can also lead to biological disasters. With the advent of bio-terrorism, there is a growing realisation that biological agents can also be used as weapons of mass destruction. The spread of Spanish Influenza of 1917-18, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) / Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Swine Flu (H1N1), Avian Influenza (H5N1), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), dengue, chikunguniya, Ebola o...
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Type: Invited Presentation Source Type: research
Influenza A and B viruses are the most common human respiratory pathogens that cause annual epidemics with high morbidity and significant mortality. Occasionally influenza A viruses have caused pandemic outbreaks affecting millions of people worldwide. On June 11, 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) raised the global pandemic alert level to phase 6, the pandemic phase, in response to the emergence and global spread of a novel influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus that contained a previously unseen combination of genes of swine origin.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
INTRODUCTION According to the Center for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED), natural disasters are classified as geophysical, metrological, hydrological, climatological and biological. These five disaster types encompass 12 disaster types and more than 30 sub-types. The 20th Century witnessed an increase in disaster losses, and this has continued its upward trend in the current Century. Climate change will increase the rate of increase of disasters, particularly those of meteorological origin. This is reflected in the fact that, of all natural hazards, floods are the most frequent and their impacts are also i...
Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Source Type: research
Summary Many wild swine populations in different parts of the World have experienced an unprecedented demographic explosion that may result in increased exposure of humans to wild swine zoonotic pathogens. Interactions between humans and wild swine leading to pathogen transmission could come from different ways, being hunters and game professionals the most exposed to acquiring infections from wild swine. However, increasing human settlements in semi‐natural areas, outdoor activities, socio‐economic changes and food habits may increase the rate of exposure to wild swine zoonotic pathogens and to potentially emerging pa...
Source: Transboundary and Emerging Diseases - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
In the past decade, the H1N1 virus and Ebola are just two of the diseases whose spread was spurred by international airline travel. Screening passengers at airports, therefore, could be one key method for slowing the global spread of infectious diseases. And although a team lead by UCLA researchers has found that airport screening misses at least half of infected travelers, the scientists say that rate could be improved. Their research was published in eLife, a highly regarded open-access online science journal. The life scientists used a mathematical model to analyze screening for six viruses: the SARS coronavirus, the Eb...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
More News: Epidemics | Epidemiology | Health | Influenza | Middle East Health | Outbreaks | Swine Flu