Who will be the personal brain trainers of the future?

Brain-fitness industry caters to worried boomers (Crain’s): “Mr. Fernandez…compares the brain-fitness industry of today with the physical-fitness industry of half a century or more ago. Whereas once there were no health clubs or personal trainers, today they’re ubiquitous. “Who will be the personal brain trainers of the future?” he says. “Are they going to be doctors, life coaches, neuropsychologists? Will health clubs expand to incorporate brain fitness? Or will people go to separate facilities that specialize in keeping people’s brains sharp?” Anecdotal evidence suggests demand for such services is growing. Diane Wilson, founder of Grimard Wilson Consulting, a Chicago practice offering career coaching, psychotherapy and neurotherapy, says about half her clients are mid-career professionals who “want to tap into ways of making their brain work more effectively. People are expected to multitask more in their jobs, and they feel under the gun.” …Sherrie All is owner and director of Chicago Center for Cognitive Wellness in Evanston. “What I’ve seen in my work as a neuropsychologist is that a lot of people have stimulating jobs, so more mental stimulation is probably the last thing they need for brain wellness,” she says. “A lot of things in our lifestyle affect how our brains age.” To Learn More: Executive Summary: Infographic on the Digital Brain Health Market 2012–20...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neurologists Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness baby-boomers Brain-Fitness health-clubs neuropsychologist neurotherapy personal brain trainers Psychotherapy Source Type: blogs

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This study follows on from a previous evaluation of the Neuro-Physiological Psychotherapy...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
By Matthew Warren The placebo effect is a curious phenomenon. A wealth of literature has shown that inert treatments can not only produce medical benefits like pain relief, but also have cognitive effects like boosting creativity and learning. And while many of those studies involve misleading people into thinking that they are receiving an effective intervention, a new study in Scientific Reports shows that this deception is not always necessary. Researchers have found that taking a placebo can reduce people’s anxiety before a test — even when they know they are taking an inactive pill.  A...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Emotion Mental health The self Source Type: blogs
As many as one in four preschool-aged children are estimated to struggle with psychosocial stress and social-emotional issues; yet, interventions are often postponed until older ages when change is actually more difficult. Reasons for this include limited interventions, paucity of FDA approved medications for young children, as well as the dearth of clinicians adequately trained in psychotherapeutic approaches for young children. This commentary outlines indications of the four most commonly used evidence-based dyadic psychotherapies for young children: Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) and Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Mak M, Starkowska A, Tyburski E, Samochowiec J Abstract In medicine, early disease detection is crucial, as it enables early intervention and increasesthe likelihood of successful treatment. Psychoprophylaxis is directed to persons from the socalled high-risk groups. First episode psychosis is usually preceded by various difficulties in day to day functioning, which due to their non-specific intensity or duration are hard to classify as symptoms of a mental disorder according to available classifications of diseases. There is evidence that using early intervention like elements of cognitive behavioral psyc...
Source: Psychiatria Polska - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatr Pol Source Type: research
ConclusionsResults highlight the unique ways caring professionals make sense of and apply mindfulness to their work, with particular attention to the interplay of intrapersonal and interpersonal dimensions of the caring process. Results suggest that mindfulness cultivates certain skills that are especially relevant to the occupational demands of caring professionals.
Source: Mindfulness - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: SSCM utilises well established clinical management for AN (with a sustained focus on normalised eating and weight restoration) coupled with supportive therapy principles and strategies. Common factors across both arms include core counselling skills and a positive therapeutic alliance to promote adherence and retention in treatment for AN. Compared to other comparator therapies to date, SSCM is a simpler therapy without unique or novel theoretically derived strategies. Comparable outcomes with more complex psychotherapies raise the question of whether the combined core components of SSCM may be sufficient for ...
Source: Australasian Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Australas Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Aloisi G, Zucchelli A, Aloisi B, Romanelli G, Marengoni A Abstract In patients with heart failure (HF), depression is common and associated with adverse outcomes such as reduced adherence to treatment, poor quality of life, increased hospitalizations and elevated mortality. Despite these adverse impacts, depression remain underdiagnosed in HF patients. We performed a target review of the literature to identify the association between HF and depression, to examine the mechanisms that link these two conditions and to identify instruments for an accurate diagnosis and treatment of depression in HF patients. D...
Source: Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Monaldi Arch Chest Dis Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Implications regarding current treatment guidelines for this population are discussed; and a call is made for interventions which actively consider and address the neurodevelopmental impact of maltreatment. PMID: 31525563 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Child Abuse and Neglect - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Child Abuse Negl Source Type: research
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common, often debilitating mental health condition that occurs in some people who have experienced trauma. It can have a negative impact on mood, mimicking depression, and is characterized by petrifying episodes in which affected people re-experience trauma. New research suggests psychotherapy may provide a long-lasting reduction of distressing symptoms. Over the course of a lifetime, many people directly experience or witness trauma, such as sexual assault, violence, or natural disasters. Experts estimate that 10% to 20% of these people will experience acute (short-term) PTSD. So...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Mental Health Source Type: blogs
 It seems like every day there is another mass shooting in the news: Newtown, Parkland, Odessa, Dayton. And most of these news reports allude to the shooter having mental illness. But is this true? Common wisdom holds that someone must be mentally ill to do such a thing. But is it really that simple? Join us for a nuanced discussion with Dr. John Grohol, the founder of PsychCentral.com, as he explains how media bias and slanted reporting have contributed to the myths and misunderstandings of who is violent in America. SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW Guest information for ‘Mass Shootings and Mental Illness’ Podca...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Interview Mental Health and Wellness Podcast Psychiatry Psychology The Psych Central Show Violence and Aggression Source Type: blogs
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