The PROblem Gambling RESearch Study (PROGRESS) research protocol: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of psychological interventions for problem gambling

This study was a mixed-methods design, with a parallel group, pragmatic RCT as the primary component, and embedded qualitative studies conducted alongside. A total of 297 participants were recruited from the community in Victoria, Australia. Individuals aged 18 years and over, could communicate in English and wished to receive treatment for a gambling problem were eligible. Participants were randomly allocated in to 1 of the 4 psychological interventions: CBT, BT, MI and NDST. Repeated measures were conducted at pretreatment and post-treatment, and 6 and 12 months post-treatment. The statistical analysis will use an intention-to-treat approach. Multilevel mixed modelling will be used to examine changes in the primary outcome measures: gambling symptom severity, using the Gambling Symptom Assessment Scale, and gambling behaviours (frequency, time and expenditure). Secondary outcomes are depression, anxiety, stress and alcohol use. Individual semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted at pretreatment and post-treatment and 12 months post-treatment for a subset of participants (n=66). Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the Victorian Department of Justice, Monash University and the University of Melbourne Human Research Ethics Committees. Findings will be reported in a government report, peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN01629698.
Source: BMJ Open - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Open access, Addiction, Mental health, Public health Protocol Source Type: research

Related Links:

  What is the link between addiction and mental illness? Is addiction a choice? In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Gabe and Lisa discuss whether addiction should be classified as a disease and whether or not it should require medical treatment. Gabe also shares his personal story of addiction and how it tied in with his bipolar disorder. What’s your take? Tune in for an in-depth discussion which covers every angle of this often controversial topic. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We Love Written Reviews!  About The Not Crazy podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Recovery Source Type: blogs
AbstractAlcohol misuse and depression are highly comorbid. Self-medication theory posits that depressed individuals use alcohol to reduce negative emotions. Research suggests that the co-pattern of depression and alcohol misuse is not uniform, and that emerging adults transitioning out of university can be differentiated into subgroups based on their co-patterns. We aimed to replicate and extend this study with emerging adults during university by examining whether baseline individual differences predicted subgroup membership. Undergraduates (N = 300) completed four waves of self-reports at 6-month intervals ...
Source: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction - Category: Addiction Source Type: research
Research by Centre for Addiction and Mental Health indicates rise in reports of loneliness, depression, alcohol consumption during COVID-19 outbreak.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news
AbstractIndigenous communities lack representation in psychiatric epidemiology despite disproportionate exposure to risk factors. We document the cumulative and 12-month prevalence of psychiatric disorders across the early life course among a sample of Indigenous young adults and compare prospective and retrospective reporting of lifetime mental disorders. This community-based participatory research includes data from 735 Indigenous people from 8 reservations/reserves. Personal interviews were conducted between 2002 –2010 and 2017–2018 totaling 9 waves; diagnostic assessments of DSM-IV-TR alcohol abuse/dependen...
Source: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction - Category: Addiction Source Type: research
AbstractThe current study aimed to investigate if general and alcohol-related social media use predicts symptoms of depression and anxiety. Students in Bergen, Norway, participated in a Web-based survey during fall 2015 (T1) and a follow-up survey during fall 2016 (T2). A total of 5217 participated in both surveys. Crude and adjusted linear regression analyses were conducted to investigate if social media use at T1 predicted depression and anxiety at T2. Several social media use variables (e.g., using Instagram) were positively associated with depression and anxiety over time, but these associations became non-significant ...
Source: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction - Category: Addiction Source Type: research
With spending so many hours inside, it can be so easy to seek comfort in food. Especially when some of us have enormous stock piles of tasty snacks and quick shelf stable carbohydrates like cereal, pasta and rice. Perhaps emotional eating is a new phenomena or we’ve struggled over the years with binge eating. Binge-eating is defined as consuming unusually large amounts of food typically in a short period of time and feeling unable to stop eating. During these stressful times we want to maintain emotional, mental and physical balance. Ensuring that we are getting the right nutrients without the self harm of overeating...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Binge Eating Coronavirus Eating Disorders COVID-19 Cravings Emotional Eating emotional overeating Source Type: news
Abstract Pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) was originally isolated from the hypothalamus and found to stimulate adenylyl cyclase in the pituitary. Later studies showed that this peptide and its receptors (PAC1, VPAC1, and VPAC2) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). Consistent with its distribution in the CNS, the PACAP/PAC1 receptor system is involved in several physiological responses, such as mediation of the stress response, modulation of nociception, regulation of prolactin release, food intake, etc. This system is also implicated in different pathological states, e...
Source: Neuropharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Neuropharmacology Source Type: research
In this study, we tested the hypothesis that an implicit preference for alcohol over abstinence predicts relapse in patients with low, but not high, alcohol insight. Participants consisted of 77 patients who had received treatment for severe alcohol use disorder in a hospital in France. During hospitalization, they completed a self-report measure of insight and an implicit association test to assess implicit preference for alcohol over abstinence. The primary outcome was relapse assessed one month after discharge. Control variables were gender, age, cognitive deficit, anxiety, depression, craving, and impulsivity. Data wer...
Source: Addictive Behaviors - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Behav Source Type: research
  Cannabis, weed, marijuana, pot. It goes by several names, but we all know what it smells like. As weed becomes more mainstream, we on the Not Crazy podcast want to know: Is marijuana really an effective treatment for anxiety? Is it just a coping mechanism? Or a vice? In today’s podcast, Gabe and Jackie look at the research and weigh out the evidence. They also interview Eileen Davidson, a rheumatoid arthritis patient who regularly uses marijuana as a medicine to see what she has to say. What’s your take? Tune in for an open-minded discussion about weed. (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE &REV...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Medications Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
While some people who’ve become addicted to alcohol and drugs have to hit rock bottom before they’re ready to accept treatment, most realize or can be convinced of the need to get professional help long before such a calamitous event. As for the timing, knowing when you are ready for treatment, it’s different for everyone. It may help to know some of the common signs you’re ready to take the crucial next step.  You’ve Had Enough — And So Has Everyone Else The list of addictive behaviors is long and varied, including problem drinking and alcohol abuse that descends into alcohol use d...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Habits Substance Abuse Source Type: news
More News: Addiction | Alcoholism | Anxiety | Behavioural Therapy | Cognitive Behavior Therapy | Conferences | Depression | Expenditures | General Medicine | Government | Health | International Medicine & Public Health | Medical Ethics | Men | Psychology | Statistics | Study