Infertile worms resist infection-induced neurodegeneration

(Duke University) Mounting evidence points to a link between infections, the immune response, and neurodegenerative diseases. New findings from Duke appearing in the Journal of Biological Chemistry show that infection with pathogenic bacteria causes neurodegeneration in the worm C. elegans, creating neural changes that are hallmarks of illnesses like Alzheimer's disease in humans. The study also yielded a big surprise: sterile animals appeared to be protected from neurodegeneration.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Related Links:

Gui-Jiang Wei1,2, Ming-Qing Yuan1, Li-He Jiang1, Yu-Lan Lu3, Chun-Hong Liu3, Hong-Cheng Luo3, Hua-Tuo Huang3, Zong-Quan Qi1* and Ye-Sheng Wei1,2* 1Department of Cell Biology, Medical College of Guangxi University, Nanning, China 2Department of Medical Laboratory, Affiliated Hospital of Guilin Medical University, Guilin, China 3Department of Medical Laboratory, Affiliated Hospital of Youjiang Medical University for Nationalities, Baise, China miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs modulating gene expression, and variants in miRNA genes are involved in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke (IS). However, the effect of mi...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
In this study, a link between mitochondrial changes and infant temperament has also been suggested. Maternal psychosocial stress and lifetime trauma have been associated with decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number in the placenta (115, 116).IndividualityChronic stress links changes in the epigenetic landscape with health conditions (117). Different cell types are characterized by distinct patterns of gene expression due to developmental, environmental, physiological, and pathological reasons (117). Epigenetic mechanisms affect gene function in a dynamic way as a result of different environmental exposures during fetal dev...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions In conclusion, articles in this Research Topic made a very significant contribution to our understanding of the role played by environmental factors, dysbiotic conditions, and infections in triggering diseases. Since this is a rapidly expanding area of research, many other factors contributing to the onset of these diseases are not covered here. We are confident, however, that further studies will expand the list as well as bring a better understanding of mechanisms involved in the onset of autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. Author Contributions All authors listed have made a substantial, direct and i...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Because it has become such a frequent item in everyday meals, suggesting that something so commonplace must be fine, people often ask: Is wheat really that bad? Let’s therefore catalog the health conditions that are associated with wheat consumption. Health conditions we know with 100% certainty are caused by consumption of wheat and related grains: Celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis, cerebellar ataxia, “idiopathic” peripheral neuropathy, temporal lobe seizures, gluten encephalopathy, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, tooth decay Health conditions ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates autoimmune diabetes gluten-free grain-free grains wheat wheat belly Source Type: blogs
It continues to happen: I run into people who say to me “I follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle. I eat gluten-free!” When I ask them what that means, they tell me that they only eat gluten-free bread, pasta, pizza, cookies, etc. I’m not entirely sure why this misinterpretation of the Wheat Belly message is so common. Let’s talk about this important distinction, as being gluten-free can be an absolute health and weight disaster, unlike the magnificent health and weight loss we enjoy on the Wheat Belly lifestyle when done right. It’s perfectly fine to be gluten-free, i.e., avoiding wheat, rye, and b...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates autoimmune blood sugar gluten gluten-free grain grain-free grains Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
There is no acceptable scientific evidence that chiropractors can treat Alzheimer's disease, cancer, diabetes, infertility, infections, autism, ADHD or Down syndrome. And yet, some practitioners in this province claim they can.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/British Columbia Source Type: news
Human β-defensin 1 update: potential clinical applications of the restless warrior. Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2018 Sep 17;: Authors: Álvarez ÁH, Velázquez MM, de Oca EPM Abstract Human β-defensin 1 (hBD-1) is a multifaceted antimicrobial peptide being a tumour suppressor and, depending on call of duty, capable of inducing self-nets and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and/or kill bacteria, participates in inflammatory responses in chronic diseases including hBD-3 upregulation and also capable of up/downregulation in the presence of certain species of Lactobac...
Source: The International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Int J Biochem Cell Biol Source Type: research
(CNN) — Alzheimer’s disease. Diabetes. Arthritis. Unwanted hair growth. Baldness. Infertility. Erectile dysfunction. Hangovers. Glaucoma. Cancer. If you have an ailment, there’s a good chance that someone, somewhere, is studying whether turmeric can treat it. There are more than 15,000 manuscripts published about curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, and about 50 manuscripts added to this collection each week, according to the National Institutes of Health. “It’s really taken on sort of panacea-like properties in terms of the things it’s being studied for and the things it has bee...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Local TV turmeric Source Type: news
Abstract The G protein-coupled receptors 3, 6, and 12 (GPR3, GPR6, and GPR12) comprise a family of closely related orphan receptors with no confirmed endogenous ligands. These receptors are constitutively active and capable of signaling through G protein-mediated and non-G protein-mediated mechanisms. These orphan receptors have previously been reported to play important roles in many normal physiological functions and to be involved in a variety of pathological conditions. Although they are orphans, GPR3, GPR6, and GPR12 are phylogenetically most closely related to the cannabinoid receptors. Using β-arrestin...
Source: Acta Pharmacologica Sinica - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Acta Pharmacol Sin Source Type: research
Men and women follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and can undergo important and sometime startling hormonal changes. Though results vary with stage of life—young adults, middle-aged, older—there are a variety of hormonal changes that women and men typically experience, some in concert, others independently. Such hormonal shifts can be powerful and part of the health-restoring menu of changes that develop with this lifestyle. They can even improve a relationship in a number of ways, both physically and emotionally, especially if we weave in some of the newer Wheat Belly/Undoctored concepts and practices such as oxy...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle estradiol estrogen hormonal hormones Inflammation low-carb oxytocin testosterone Thyroid Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
More News: Alzheimer's | Chemistry | Health | Infertility | International Medicine & Public Health | Neurology | Reproduction Medicine | Study