Infertile worms resist infection-induced neurodegeneration

(Duke University) Mounting evidence points to a link between infections, the immune response, and neurodegenerative diseases. New findings from Duke appearing in the Journal of Biological Chemistry show that infection with pathogenic bacteria causes neurodegeneration in the worm C. elegans, creating neural changes that are hallmarks of illnesses like Alzheimer's disease in humans. The study also yielded a big surprise: sterile animals appeared to be protected from neurodegeneration.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

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There is no acceptable scientific evidence that chiropractors can treat Alzheimer's disease, cancer, diabetes, infertility, infections, autism, ADHD or Down syndrome. And yet, some practitioners in this province claim they can.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/British Columbia Source Type: news
Human β-defensin 1 update: potential clinical applications of the restless warrior. Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2018 Sep 17;: Authors: Álvarez ÁH, Velázquez MM, de Oca EPM Abstract Human β-defensin 1 (hBD-1) is a multifaceted antimicrobial peptide being a tumour suppressor and, depending on call of duty, capable of inducing self-nets and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and/or kill bacteria, participates in inflammatory responses in chronic diseases including hBD-3 upregulation and also capable of up/downregulation in the presence of certain species of Lactobac...
Source: The International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Int J Biochem Cell Biol Source Type: research
(CNN) — Alzheimer’s disease. Diabetes. Arthritis. Unwanted hair growth. Baldness. Infertility. Erectile dysfunction. Hangovers. Glaucoma. Cancer. If you have an ailment, there’s a good chance that someone, somewhere, is studying whether turmeric can treat it. There are more than 15,000 manuscripts published about curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, and about 50 manuscripts added to this collection each week, according to the National Institutes of Health. “It’s really taken on sort of panacea-like properties in terms of the things it’s being studied for and the things it has bee...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Local TV turmeric Source Type: news
Abstract The G protein-coupled receptors 3, 6, and 12 (GPR3, GPR6, and GPR12) comprise a family of closely related orphan receptors with no confirmed endogenous ligands. These receptors are constitutively active and capable of signaling through G protein-mediated and non-G protein-mediated mechanisms. These orphan receptors have previously been reported to play important roles in many normal physiological functions and to be involved in a variety of pathological conditions. Although they are orphans, GPR3, GPR6, and GPR12 are phylogenetically most closely related to the cannabinoid receptors. Using β-arrestin...
Source: Acta Pharmacologica Sinica - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Acta Pharmacol Sin Source Type: research
Men and women follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and can undergo important and sometime startling hormonal changes. Though results vary with stage of life—young adults, middle-aged, older—there are a variety of hormonal changes that women and men typically experience, some in concert, others independently. Such hormonal shifts can be powerful and part of the health-restoring menu of changes that develop with this lifestyle. They can even improve a relationship in a number of ways, both physically and emotionally, especially if we weave in some of the newer Wheat Belly/Undoctored concepts and practices such as oxy...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle estradiol estrogen hormonal hormones Inflammation low-carb oxytocin testosterone Thyroid Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Abstract Mitochondria play a fundamental role during development of the female germline. They are fragmented, round and small. Despite these characteristics suggesting that they are inactive, there is accumulating evidence that mitochondrial dysfunctions are a major cause of infertility and generation of aneuploidies in humans. In addition, mitochondria and their own genomes (mitochondrial DNA - mtDNA) may become damaged with time, which might be one reason why aging leads to infertility. As a result, mitochondria have been proposed as an important target for evaluating oocyte and embryo quality, and developing tr...
Source: Cell Biology International - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Cell Biol Int Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion MO has emerged as a good source of traditional medicines. Some uses of this plant in traditional medicines have been validated by pharmacological investigations. However, the molecular mechanism, structure-activity relationship, and potential synergistic and antagonistic effects of its multi-components such as polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, anthraquinones and iridoid glycosides need to be further elucidated, and the structural feature of polysaccharides also need to be further clarified. Sophisticated analytical technologies should be developed to comprehensively evaluate the quality of MO based on HPLC-fing...
Source: Journal of Ethnopharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
As The Author of Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories, I'm honored to be chosen to be part AlzAuthors. This post is courtesy of AlzAuthors. Read through for some incredible deals on ebooks written by authors who've been where you are. MOE is among the books on sale. All are $2.99 or less. November is National Caregiver Appreciation Month, a time to recognize the long hours, sacrifice, and love all caregivers bring to the task of caring for a loved one with dementia or any long-term illness. In honor of their efforts, AlzAuthors is hosting an eBook sale and giveaway! This is a terrific way f...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Calcium and integrin-binding protein 1 (CIB1) is an EF-hand calcium binding protein, which is involved in many cellular processes, including calcium signaling, cell survival and proliferation, cell migration, cell adhesion and apoptosis. A number of studies have found that CIB1 is ubiquitously expressed and is related to various human diseases, such as cancer, Alzheimer ’s disease (AD), cardiac hypertrophy and male infertility. The mechanism of CIB1 in human diseases is still not clear, although multiple functions of CIB1 are modulated by interacting with numerous interacting partners. As a calcium binding protein, t...
Source: Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
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