Light zaps viruses: How photosensitization can stop viruses from infecting cells

A UCLA-led team of researchers has found evidence that photosensitizing a virus's membrane covering can inhibit its ability to enter cells and potentially lead to the development of stronger, cheaper medications to fight a host of tough viruses.   The UCLA AIDS Institute study, published in the February issue of the Journal of Virology, is part of ongoing research on a compound called LJ001, a "broad-spectrum" antiviral that can attack a wide range of microbes.   The current paper advances the science by showing that the process of photosensitization — heightening a biological organism's sensitivity to certain damaging processes induced by light — applies to more than just LJ001. This could pave the way for a cost-effective way to make blood products safer, which is particularly important in resource-poor countries where deadly viruses run rampant.   There are two categories of viruses: lipid-enveloped and non-enveloped. Enveloped viruses, including many that are of great public health concern, have a membrane that serves as a mechanism through which the microbe inserts its genome into a host cell, infecting it.   Photosensitizers, which have the ability to damage a virus's genetic material, can in many cases prevent infection, according to first author Frederic Vigant, who conducted the study as a postdoctoral researcher in microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.  ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this review suggest that in settings with limited resources, current guideline recommendations to provide enhanced adherence counselling can result in resuppression of a substantial number of these patients, avoiding unnecessary drug regimen changes. Appropriate action on viral load results is limited across a range of settings, highlighting the importance of viral load cascade analyses to identify gaps and focus quality improvement to ensure that action is taken on the results of viral load testing. PMID: 31746541 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the International AIDS Society - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: J Int AIDS Soc Source Type: research
Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums
Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums
ConclusionOur results show that fluoroscopic-guided NGT placement is a highly safe and effective procedure for patients with advanced HNC requiring enteral feeding.
Source: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
ConclusionSynergistic and additive effects between these two-drug combinations offer an attractive chemotherapeutic regimen against drug-resistant clinical MTB isolates.
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
The practice of preparing for sex with an enema, or a'rectal douche,'is common for gay and bisexual men, but they need to understand how to protect themselves during anal sex.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news
Authors: Ren C, Zhang Z, Wang S, Zhu W, Zheng P, Wang W Abstract Metastasis is the main cause of increasing cancer morbidity and mortality. However, the underlying mechanism of cancer metastasis remains largely unknown. In the present study, we identified one circular RNA (circRNA) closely related to the metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC), namely hsa_circ_0001178. CRC patients with high hsa_circ_0001178 were more prone to have metastatic clinical features, advanced TNM stage and adverse prognosis. Stable knockdown of hsa_circ_0001178 significantly weakened CRC cell migratory and invasive capabilities in vitro as...
Source: Biological Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Tags: Biol Chem Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 November 2019Source: Arab Journal of GastroenterologyAuthor(s): Shogo Nakano, Kosuke Minaga, Yukitaka Yamashita
Source: Arab Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
ConclusionDespite even a low dose administration of albumin during SBP, renal dysfunction and HRS occurred less than described in literature. These results associated with cost considerations could suggest to use such an intervention during SBP or to select high risk patients who must receive albumin perfusion during SBP.
Source: Arab Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
The human genome has been proposed to contribute to interpersonal variability in the way we respond to nutritional intake. However, personalized diets solely based on gene-nutrient interactions have not lived up to their expectations to date. Advances in microbiome research have indicated that a science-based generation of a personalized diet based on a combination of clinical and microbial features may constitute a promising new approach enabling accurate prediction of dietary responses. In addition, scientific advances in our understanding of defined dietary components and their effects on human physiology led to the inc...
Source: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Invited Review Source Type: research
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