Truncated seasonal activity patterns of the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) in central and southern California

Publication date: Available online 25 October 2015 Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases Author(s): Andrew J. MacDonald, Cheryl J. Briggs Patterns of seasonal activity and density of host-seeking western blacklegged ticks, Ixodes pacificus, were investigated in central and southern California. Weekly to monthly drag sampling was undertaken at two sites in Santa Barbara County and one site in Los Angeles County over multiple years. Adult I. pacificus became active in the winter (late November) and were rare or absent by late April to early May. Nymphal ticks became active in early to late February, were absent by early May to early June, and were rarely encountered using the drag method throughout their period of peak seasonal activity. Larval ticks became active earlier in the season, or at the same time as nymphs (early to late February) and were absent by early May. These results suggest a highly truncated period of I. pacificus seasonal questing activity, particularly apparent in the juvenile tick stages, in central and southern California relative to observed patterns in Lyme-endemic northwestern California. Notably, the highly truncated period of questing activity of the juvenile stages has important implications for pathogen transmission dynamics in that there exists only a brief window for horizontally transmitted pathogens to be acquired by one tick cohort and subsequently transmitted, through hosts, to the next tick cohort in this system. The broader patterns obse...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research

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This study shows that humus type can be indicative of nymph abundance. Three types of humus were observed: (1) moder, (2) mull, and (3) mull-moder humus. One of them, moder humus, which is characterized by a thick layer of fragmented leaves, was found in multivariate analyses to be strongly associated with the nymph abundance. This study demonstrates that factors such as saturation deficit do not suffice to explain the differences in nymph abundance among sites. The composition of the soil and especially the type of humus should also be taken into consideration when assessing acarological risk.
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE: Vectorborne diseases are a large and growing public health problem in the United States, characterized by geographic specificity and frequent pathogen emergence and introduction. Differences in distribution and transmission dynamics of tickborne and mosquitoborne diseases are often rooted in biologic differences of the vectors. To effectively reduce transmission and respond to outbreaks will require major national improvement of surveillance, diagnostics, reporting, and vector control, as well as new tools, including vaccines. PMID: 29723166 [PubMed - in process]
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our data reported an high percentage of Lyme Disease infection (19%) in non endemic area. The definition of a multidisciplinary working group and a clinical care pathway allowed a better clinical management of Lyme disease cases treated in Sacco Hospital, Milan. PMID: 29600690 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia - Category: Dermatology Tags: G Ital Dermatol Venereol Source Type: research
This study shows that humus type can be indicative of nymph abundance. Three types of humus were observed: (1) moder, (2) mull, and (3) mull-moder humus. One of them, moder humus, which is characterized by a thick layer of fragmented leaves, was found in multivariate analyses to be strongly associated with the nymph abundance. This study demonstrates that factors such as saturation deficit do not suffice to explain the differences in nymph abundance among sites. The composition of the soil and especially the type of humus should also be taken into consideration when assessing acarological risk.
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
A constant increase in the incidence of tick-borne diseases has been observed in Europe since the last decade of the twentieth century. In Poland, the most common zoonoses transmitted by Ixodes ricinus ticks are tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and Lyme disease. These diseases have become a serious clinical problem, especially in Podlaskie Region, which is considered an endemic area for these diseases (Czupryna et al., 2011).
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions This study confirms that subclinical Borrelia seroconversion is common in south-eastern Sweden. The findings further suggest that male sex, younger age together with B. gariniii induced levels of IL-10, IL-17A and CCL20 may be associated with a subclinical course.
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
In the summer of 2016, Jerome Goddard, a medical entomologist in Mississippi, received an email from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with a desperate ask. The agency was conducting an “urgent” search for insect scientists around the U.S. who could take up to a six-month paid leave from work to help the CDC fight the Zika outbreak in the U.S., and possibly respond to areas with local transmission if needed. “That’s how bad it is—they need to borrow someone,” says Goddard, an extension professor of medical entomology at Mississippi State University. “We can&...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 3 February 2018 Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases Author(s): Benjamin Cull, Maaike E. Pietzsch, Kayleigh M. Hansford, Emma L. Gillingham, Jolyon M. Medlock Public Health England’s passive Tick Surveillance Scheme (TSS) records the distribution, seasonality and host associations of ticks submitted from across the United Kingdom (UK), and helps to inform the UK government on emerging tick-borne disease risks. Here we summarise data collected through surveillance during 2010–2016, and compare with previous TSS data from 2005 to 2009, particularly in relation to the primary Ly...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 December 2017 Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases Author(s): Andrea Egizi, Vivien Roegner, Ary Faraji, Sean P. Healy, Terry L. Schulze, Robert A. Jordan Historical specimens, when available, can provide new insight into the distribution and evolution of pathogens that may not be discernible from more recent samples. We used ticks collected from hunter-killed white-tailed deer in New Jersey in 2002 to examine the prevalence and distribution of four pathogens transmitted by Ixodes scapularis, the blacklegged tick. Infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Babesia microti, and ...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 November 2017 Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases Author(s): P. Mead, S. Hook, S. Niesobecki, J. Ray, J. Meek, M. Delorey, C. Prue, A. Hinckley Prevention of tick-borne diseases requires an understanding of when and where exposure to ticks is most likely. We used an epidemiologic approach to define these parameters for residents of a Lyme-endemic region. Two persons in each of 500 Connecticut households were asked to complete a log each night for one week during June, 2013. Participants recorded their whereabouts in 15min increments (indoors, outdoors in their yard, outdoors on other...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
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