Male Infertility Might Signal Higher Odds of Testicular Cancer

Abnormally low sperm count tied to greater risk, study suggestsSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Male Infertility, Testicular Cancer
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: 6 November 2018Source: Cell Reports, Volume 25, Issue 6Author(s): Brian P. Hermann, Keren Cheng, Anukriti Singh, Lorena Roa-De La Cruz, Kazadi N. Mutoji, I-Chung Chen, Heidi Gildersleeve, Jake D. Lehle, Max Mayo, Birgit Westernströer, Nathan C. Law, Melissa J. Oatley, Ellen K. Velte, Bryan A. Niedenberger, Danielle Fritze, Sherman Silber, Christopher B. Geyer, Jon M. Oatley, John R. McCarreySummarySpermatogenesis is a complex and dynamic cellular differentiation process critical to male reproduction and sustained by spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). Although patterns of gene expression have been...
Source: Cell Reports - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
We report a case of a 10-month-old boy with an incarcerated inguinal hernia who was discovered to have transverse testicular ectopia following hernia reduction. The patient was treated with herniorrhaphy and open transseptal orchiopexy.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractChemotherapy-induced gonadal dysfunction resulting in transient or persistent infertility depends on the type of drugs and cumulative dose, and it is an important long-term complication, especially for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. Due to its importance, a clinical practice guideline for fertility preservation in childhood and AYA cancer patients was published by the Japan Society of Clinical Oncology (JSCO) in 2017. Although the precise mechanisms remain unclear, several studies reported that the cancer itself, not the cancer treatment, adversely affected semen quality. It is reported that that...
Source: International Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Discussion Cryptorchidism is the failure of one or both testes to descend from the abdomen into the scrotum. Congenital undescended testis (UDT)is common in young infants (1-4% in term infants and 45% in preterm infants) in that the testes will be palpable but remain high, but most testes will descend by 3-6 months and by 9 months of age only 1% remain undescended. The scrotum often appears underdeveloped. Sometimes the testes cannot be identified and is intra-abdominal at birth. Intra-abdominal testes are less likely to migrate to the scrotum and therefore are more likely to remain undescended. Acquired undescended test...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
In a large Australian study, researchers found that baby boys born with undescended testes had a higher risk of health problems like infertility and cancer, especially if corrective surgery was delayed.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Testicles Babies and Infants Testicular Cancer Children and Childhood Surgery and Surgeons Men and Boys Source Type: news
To analyze the sperm proteome of patients with testicular cancer non-seminoma (TCNS) before cancer treatment and identify proteins responsible for the altered reproductive function.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Poster session Source Type: research
Boys born with undescended testes had 2.4 times the risk of adult testicular cancer compared to other boys, the University of Sydney researchers reported.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
FRIDAY, Aug. 31, 2018 -- Young boys with undescended testes are at increased risk for testicular cancer and infertility in adulthood, new research suggests. Undescended testes are the most common birth defect in infant boys, affecting one in 100....
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
(University of Sydney) Medical researchers are urging greater compliance with guidelines recommending surgery for undescended testes (UDT) before 18 months of age following new evidence that UDT more than doubles the risk of testicular cancer and increases infertility in adult males.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS Results of this study suggest that ozone therapy, either as a single agent or in combination with hCG, is a promising approach for protection of testicular functions. PMID: 30130360 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
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