Male Infertility Might Signal Higher Odds of Testicular Cancer

Abnormally low sperm count tied to greater risk, study suggests
Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Oncology, Reproductive Medicine, Fertility, News, Source Type: news

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. Stadler There is a correlation between cryptorchidism and an increased risk of testicular cancer and infertility. During orchidopexy, testicular biopsies are performed to confirm the presence of type A dark (Ad) spermatogonia, which are a marker for low infertility risk (LIR). The Ad spermatogonia are absent in high infertility risk (HIR) patients, who are treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) to significantly lower the risk of infertility. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the molecular events involved in cryptorchidism. Previously, we compared the transcriptomes of LIR versus HIR...
Source: Genes - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Purpose of review Although platinum-based chemotherapy (CHT) remains the cornerstone of clinical stage I testicular germ cell tumor (GCT) treatment, its long-term toxicity and complications in cancer survivors are unclear. Recent findings Cardiovascular disease and secondary malignancies represent the most life-threatening long-term complications and typically occur 10 years after treatment. Other potential intermediate deleterious effects include pulmonary toxicity, ototoxicity, neurotoxicity, hypogonadism and infertility. The incidence and time to onset vary according to patients’ genetic susceptibility, CHT r...
Source: Current Opinion in Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: TESTICULAR CANCER: Edited by Aditya Bagrodia and Peter Albers Source Type: research
ConclusionIn cases of TML incidental finding by US with the presence of risk factors (personal history of testicular cancer, testicular atrophy, infertility, cryptorchidism) a consultation with a specialist should be considered. In the absence of risk factors, the occurrence of testicular cancer in patients with TML is similar to the risk of the general population.
Source: Basic and Clinical Andrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: There is an increasing demand for fertility preservation, especially from patients with benign disease. Only a small proportion of men utilised their banked sperm, however, those that did had a good chance of becoming fathers. Data from this study will be used to review our referral pathways and inform our future practice. PMID: 29944041 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Source Type: research
Authors: Nappi L, Ottaviano M, Rescigno P, Fazli L, Gleave ME, Damiano V, De Placido S, Palmieri G Abstract Background: Cisplatin-based chemotherapy significantly improved the survival of patients with germ cell testicular cancer. However, long term side effects of chemotherapy have non-negligible impact on the quality of life of these young patients, who have a long life expectancy after being successfully treated. Materials and Methods: 25-OH vitamin D, testosterone, FSH and LH of patients with testicular cancer were retrospectively evaluated and for each patient clinical information were collected. The tissu...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Authors: Fung C, Dinh P, Ardeshir-Rouhani-Fard S, Schaffer K, Fossa SD, Travis LB Abstract Testicular cancer has become the paradigm of adult-onset cancer survivorship, due to the young age at diagnosis and 10-year relative survival of 95%. This clinical review presents the current status of various treatment-related complications experienced by long-term testicular cancer survivors (TCS) free of disease for 5 or more years after primary treatment. Cardiovascular disease and second malignant neoplasms represent the most common potentially life-threatening late effects. Other long-term adverse outcomes include neuro...
Source: Advances in Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Adv Urol Source Type: research
Modern medicine has extended the survival of men with testicular cancer to greater than 95%. Because testicular cancer occurs most commonly between ages 20 and 34 years, reproductive potential is a frequent concern. Moreover, men with testicular cancer are already at greater risk for subfertility (1). The cause of this is unclear, although theories have included direct tumor effect, tumor cytokine effect, and underlying germ cell abnormalities that dispose toward both infertility and cancer development.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
Abstract The human Y chromosome harbors genes that are responsible for testis development and also for initiation and maintenance of spermatogenesis in adulthood. The long arm of the Y chromosome (Yq) contains many ampliconic and palindromic sequences making it predisposed to self-recombination during spermatogenesis and hence susceptible to intra-chromosomal deletions. Such deletions lead to copy number variation in genes of the Y chromosome resulting in male infertility. Three common Yq deletions that recur in infertile males are termed as AZF (Azoospermia Factor) microdeletions viz. AZFa, AZFb and AZFc. As...
Source: Reproductive Biology - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reprod Biol Endocrinol Source Type: research
UCLA researchers have made new inroads into understanding germ cell tumors, a diverse and rare group of cancers that begin in germ cells — the cells that develop into sperm and eggs. The researchers developed a protocol to recreate germ cell tumor cells from stem cells and used the new model to study the genetics of the cancer.Their findings could point the way toward new drugs to treat germ cell tumors, which account for around 3 percent of all cases of childhood and adolescent cancer.The study, published in Stem Cell Research, was led by Amander Clark, a UCLA professor of molecular cell and developmental biology an...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 6 January 2018 Source:Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology Author(s): Melissa Tharmalingam, Anne Jorgensen, Rod T. Mitchell The mammalian testis has two main roles, production of gametes for reproduction and synthesis of steroid- and peptide hormones for masculinization. These processes are tightly regulated and involve complex interactions between a number of germ and somatic cell-types that comprise a unique microenvironment known as the germ stem cell niche. In humans, failure of normal testicular development or function is associated with susceptibility to a variety of male reproduct...
Source: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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