Enough of modern health scares – we should be trusting our instincts | Yvonne Roberts

Just because the so-called medical experts tell us something, it doesn’t mean it’s trueOn Thursday, a million women experiencing the toughest time in the menopause – hot flushes, insomnia, startling mood swings – could have read the news that GPs are once again being encouraged to prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT).A study, published in 2003, had shown a significant increase in the risk of cancer. Last week, the health watchdog, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, said GPs had wrongly “lost confidence” in the drug. Women had been left to “suffer in silence”. Now, according to Nice, the benefits of HRT far outweigh the risks. Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Health Menopause Women Medical research Society Biology Science UK news Source Type: news

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Maunil K. Desai1 and Roberta Diaz Brinton2,3* 1School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States 2Center for Innovation in Brain Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States 3Departments of Pharmacology and Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States Women have a higher incidence and prevalence of autoimmune diseases than men, and 85% or more patients of multiple autoimmune diseases are female. Women undergo sweeping endocrinological changes at least twice during their lifetime, puberty and menopause, with many women undergoin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Abstract Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is subjective and has wide inter-individual variability. Given that leptin is commonly associated with fatigue syndrome, its use as a potential biomarker for CRF is being investigated. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the association between leptin and CRF in early-stage breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. In a prospective cohort study, patients completed assessments at baseline (T1), during chemotherapy (T2) and after chemotherapy (T3). Levels of plasma leptin and adipokines were measured using a Luminex bead-immunoassay and CRF was measured usin...
Source: J Cell Mol Med - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: J Cell Mol Med Source Type: research
The women’s health technology or so-called femtech market has been on the rise for the last couple of years, but it has mainly revolved around fertility and pregnancy. We believe that female health topics reach far beyond such traditional issues and players should concentrate more on menopause, endometriosis, or mental health, just to name a few areas. Thus, we tried to collect companies which are on top of their game in the conventional fertility and/or pregnancy area, but also start-ups and ventures who are looking way beyond that. Here’s our guide to 10 outstanding companies in women’s health. The w...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Business Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Telemedicine & Smartphones companies company digital digital health digital health technologies femtech health technology Innovation market women women's health Source Type: blogs
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3DCRT) impacts early QOL in undergoing adjuvant radiation for cervical cancer.
Source: Indian Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
ConclusionWithholding dexamethasone premedication in non-experiencing HSR patients after two previous cycles of weekly paclitaxel administration was safe and did not impact the higher incidence of HSR. A discontinuing dexamethasone protocol should be recommended generally in these patients, especially those with a high risk for steroid-induced side effects.
Source: Supportive Care in Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs
Conclusion. A review of the literature suggests that there are adequate data supporting the efficacy and general safety of the low-dose use of trazodone for the treatment of insomnia. keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Innov Clin Neurosci. 2017;14(9–10):24–34 Introduction Insomnia is characterized by difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or waking too early1 and is associated with significant impairments in daytime activities, which might occur despite adequate opportunities for sleep.2–6 Primary insom...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Review hypnotics insomnia sedative trazodone treatment Source Type: research
PDF Version (2.2 MB) About This Article Published: 12 June 2017 Note to readers with disabilities: EHP strives to ensure that all journal content is accessible to all readers. However, some figures and Supplemental Material published in EHP articles may not conform to 508 standards due to the complexity of the information being presented. If you need assistance accessing journal content, please contact ehponline@niehs.nih.gov. Our staff will work with you to assess and meet your accessibility needs within 3 working days. With its associated hot flashes, mood swings, and insomnia, menop...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: News Focus Source Type: research
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