Enough of modern health scares – we should be trusting our instincts | Yvonne Roberts

Just because the so-called medical experts tell us something, it doesn’t mean it’s trueOn Thursday, a million women experiencing the toughest time in the menopause – hot flushes, insomnia, startling mood swings – could have read the news that GPs are once again being encouraged to prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT).A study, published in 2003, had shown a significant increase in the risk of cancer. Last week, the health watchdog, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, said GPs had wrongly “lost confidence” in the drug. Women had been left to “suffer in silence”. Now, according to Nice, the benefits of HRT far outweigh the risks. Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Health Menopause Women Medical research Society Biology Science UK news Source Type: news

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ConclusionWithholding dexamethasone premedication in non-experiencing HSR patients after two previous cycles of weekly paclitaxel administration was safe and did not impact the higher incidence of HSR. A discontinuing dexamethasone protocol should be recommended generally in these patients, especially those with a high risk for steroid-induced side effects.
Source: Supportive Care in Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs
Conclusion. A review of the literature suggests that there are adequate data supporting the efficacy and general safety of the low-dose use of trazodone for the treatment of insomnia. keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Innov Clin Neurosci. 2017;14(9–10):24–34 Introduction Insomnia is characterized by difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or waking too early1 and is associated with significant impairments in daytime activities, which might occur despite adequate opportunities for sleep.2–6 Primary insom...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Review hypnotics insomnia sedative trazodone treatment Source Type: research
PDF Version (2.2 MB) About This Article Published: 12 June 2017 Note to readers with disabilities: EHP strives to ensure that all journal content is accessible to all readers. However, some figures and Supplemental Material published in EHP articles may not conform to 508 standards due to the complexity of the information being presented. If you need assistance accessing journal content, please contact ehponline@niehs.nih.gov. Our staff will work with you to assess and meet your accessibility needs within 3 working days. With its associated hot flashes, mood swings, and insomnia, menop...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: News Focus Source Type: research
Authors: Dongsheng H, Ling B, Jun Z, Hui TY, Qingwei Z, Jing C, Xiaoyang L Abstract Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the standard of care for postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the occurrence of menopausal symptoms in breast cancer patients receiving the AI therapy. Patients treated with AIs had an increased risk of all-grade arthralgia (1.63 [95% CI: 1.34-1.98]) and insomnia (1.24 [95% CI: 1.14-1.34]). The overall incidence of hot flashes, fatigue, arthralgia, sweating, and insomnia in patients receiving AIs was 30.47% (95% CI: 25.51%-35...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
( University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences ) Two separate UCLA studies reveal that menopause -- and the insomnia that often accompanies it -- make women age faster. The dual findings suggest these factors could increase women's risk for aging-related diseases and earlier death.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
The post My total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo oophorectomy – Joon’s story appeared first on Hysterectomy Association. At the end of July 2015 I had a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo oophorectomy. I was forty eight years old and this is my story. I was in my mid to late twenties, a mum, wife and total rock concert fan, life was great. Then my periods became “different” at one stage actually stopped for around nine to ten months. My GP told me I had no eggs! However, two years on we got our longed for special delivery, a son. After his birth my periods were normal...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Your Stories bilateral salpingo oophorectomy tah Source Type: news
The post My total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo oophorectomy – Joon’s story appeared first on Hysterectomy Association. At the end of July 2015 I had a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo oophorectomy. I was forty eight years old and this is my story. I was in my mid to late twenties, a mum, wife and total rock concert fan, life was great. Then my periods became “different” at one stage actually stopped for around nine to ten months. My GP told me I had no eggs! However, two years on we got our longed for special delivery, a son. After his birth my periods were normal...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Your Stories bilateral salpingo oophorectomy tah Source Type: news
The median age at menopause in Europe and North America ranges from 50.1 to 52.8 years [1]. Menopausal symptoms comprise vasomotor symptoms, declining bone mass, vaginal dryness, insomnia and mood disturbances [2]. The mean duration is four years but in about 10% of women, they may continue for up till 12 years [3]. Menopausal hormone therapy is recommended as the most effective treatment for vasomotor symptoms [4]. Options are unopposed estrogen, combined therapy (estrogen and progestogen) or tibolone.
Source: Maturitas - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Review article Source Type: research
(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) Chatting on the phone with a 'sleep coach' and keeping a nightly sleep diary significantly improve sleep quality and reduce insomnia in women through all stages of menopause, according to a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. The study also found that such phone-based cognitive behavioral therapy significantly reduced the degree to which hot flashes, or vasomotor symptoms, interfered with daily functioning.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news
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