Early CT Screening Is Critical to Reducing Lung Cancer Deaths

Thoracic surgeon and robotics innovator Dr. Farid Gharagozloo believes regular early screenings and better follow-up care will significantly reduce the annual number of Americans dying of lung cancer by almost two-thirds. Gharagozloo, director of cardiothoracic surgery at Florida Hospital Celebration Health, says the medical establishment in the U.S. and patients themselves share the blame for the unreasonably high number of lung cancer deaths today. Patients need to be more assertive. Doctors need to be more aggressive. Together, they can make a big difference. "We can turn this thing around — change the whole story of lung cancer — if we just approach it correctly," Gharagozloo told Asbestos.com. "And it's not that complicated. We already have the tools we need." The American Lung Association estimates that 158,000 Americans will die in 2015 from lung cancer, which is 27 percent of all cancer deaths and more than breast, colon and prostate cancers combined. November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month. Although smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke is responsible for an estimated 85 percent of all lung cancer cases, an exposure to toxic asbestos greatly increases the risk. Dr. Farid Gharagozloo shares his thoughts about robotic thoracic surgery. Early Detection Is Key to Reducing Lung Cancer Deaths Gharagozloo believes the key to reducing lung cancer deaths is an aggressive promotion of readily available CT (computed t...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

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Authors: Charytoniuk T, Małyszko M, Bączek J, Fiedorczyk P, Siedlaczek K, Małyszko J Abstract Nephrectomy, which constitutes a gold-standard procedure for the treatment of renal-cell carcinoma (RCC), has been widely discussed in the past decade as a significant risk factor of the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). RCC is the third most common genitourinary cancer in the United States, with an estimated more than 65,000 new cases and 14,970 deaths. The aim of this review was to precisely and comprehensively summarize the status of current knowledge in chronic kidney disease risk factors after nephrectom...
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
Authors: Russo Picasso MF, Vicens J, Giuliani C, Jaén ADV, Cabezón C, Figari M, Gómez Saldaño AM, Figar S Abstract Background: Two hypotheses attempt to explain the increase of thyroid cancer (TC) incidence: overdetection by excessive diagnostic scrutiny and a true increase in new cases brought about by environmental factors. Changes in the mechanism of detection and the risk of incidentally diagnosed TC could result in an increase of TC incidence. Methods: Retrospective cohort study. We identified incident cases of TC from the pathological reports of patients in a HMO and review of ...
Source: Journal of Cancer Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: J Cancer Epidemiol Source Type: research
Contributors : Ting La ; Xu D ZhangSeries Type : Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Mus musculusTo investigate miRNAs in quiescent cancer cell
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencing Mus musculus Source Type: research
(MedPage Today) -- Also, breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy?
Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN - Category: OBGYN Source Type: news
(Reuters Health) - People with diabetes are more likely to develop certain cancers than those without the condition, and a new analysis suggests that the increased risk is greater for women than for men.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 15 August 2018Source: SteroidsAuthor(s): Hajer Dahmani, Kaouthar Louati, Adel Hajri, Senda Bahri, Fathi SaftaAbstractSeveral studies have highlighted that nutritional supplements may contain undeclared anabolic steroids that are banned by the International Olympic Committee/World Anti-Doping Agency. Any kind of abuse with these drugs is extremely dangerous because of their side effects. Thus, the control of food additives in order to protect the best consumer health and to limit fraudulent practices in the field of sports is essential.This paper describes a simple and effective qualitativ...
Source: Steroids - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 August 2018Source: SteroidsAuthor(s): Julius Fink, Masahito Matsumoto, Yoshifumi TamuraAbstractSedentary lifestyle and over-nutrition are the main causes of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the same causes are major triggers of hypogonadism. Many T2D patients show low testosterone levels while hypogonadal men seem to be prone to become diabetic. Testosterone plays a major role in the regulation of muscle mass, adipose tissue, inflammation and insulin sensitivity and is therefore indirectly regulating several metabolic pathways, while T2D is commonly triggered by insulin resi...
Source: Steroids - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
(Reuters Health) - Cancer patients who use alternative, non-medical therapies may be more likely to forgo recommended medical treatments like chemotherapy and radiation, and be more likely to die as a result, a U.S. study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
The herbicide gyphosate is the world ’ s most popular weedkiller. There is widespread disagreement among lawyers, researchers and regulators over any potential links to cancer.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Defoliants and Herbicides Pesticides Environmental Working Group Monsanto Company glyphosate General Mills Inc Quaker Oats Co Source Type: news
Cancer patients who opt for alternative therapy instead of conventional medicine significantly decrease their chances of survival, according to researchers at Yale School of Medicine. Although the popularity of alternative medicine continues to grow, a recent study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found survival rates significantly reduced for those who use it as first-line therapy. Conventional cancer treatments — chemotherapy, surgery and radiation — still produce a much better chance of survival. Mesothelioma was not included in the study, but the findings are relevant to this rare ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: acupuncture cancer Alternative medicine alternative mesothelioma treatment alternative therapy survival alternative vs conventional medicine breast cancer colon cancer Conventional cancer treatments Dr. David Gorski Dr. Skyler Johnson Source Type: news
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