Long-Term Birth Control Use Soars For American Women

After nearly disappearing from the market 30 years ago, the once rarely used long-term reversible contraception is now the fastest-growing birth control method among American women.    Between 2011 and 2013, 11.6 percent of women opted for LTRC methods like implants and intrauterine devices (IUDs), up from 6 percent between 2006 and 2010, according to a report released Tuesday by the National Center for Health Statistics.   While use of the most common methods of contraception like the pill, sterilization or the male condom held steady, LTRC methods represent a small but rapidly growing share of the contraceptive choices for women. Experts note that the growth is largely driven by IUDs, while implants make up a small share of the LTRC options.   The pill is still the most popular contraceptive method, followed closely by female sterilization: More than a quarter of women aged 15 to 44 use the pill (25.9 percent), while another quarter (25.1 percent) go the route of sterilization.  Megan Kavanaugh, senior research scientist for the sexual and reproductive health-focused Guttmacher Institute, points to several factors contributing to the rise in LTRC popularity: Health care providers get more and better training on the devices, medical groups have voiced growing preference for LTRCs and consumer marketing has raised awareness of the option. "A lot of that is trickling down to the patient side," Kavanaugh said. "Patients, particularly ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 10 February 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Obstetrics &GynaecologyAuthor(s): Vasilios Tanos, Zara Abigail ToneyAbstractThe increasing rate of elective and indicated caesarean sections worldwide has led to new pathologies and management challenges. The number of patients undergoing trial of labor after caesarean section (TOLAC) is also increasing. Three professional societies provide detailed guidelines based on scientific evidence for the management of patients attempting vaginal birth after caesarean section (VBAC). However, they do not provide any recommendations f...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionsOverall, there was no significant difference in birth defects resulting from IVF ‐ICSI with autologous or donor oocytes. The births resulting from IVF‐ICSI pregnancies did not tend to have a higher rate of birth defects a compared with natural conceptions. The differences in the prevalence of certain birth defects (cardiovascular or central nervous system) reported in IVF‐ ICSI pregnancies may be due to improved surveillance modalities and early detection in pregnancies following IVF‐ICSI. A study with larger number of sample size will give us better understanding of the prevalence of reported incidence in this study.
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 February 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Obstetrics &GynaecologyAuthor(s): Vasilios Tanos, Zara Abigail ToneyAbstractThe increasing rate of elective and indicated caesarean sections worldwide has led to new pathologies and management challenges. The number of patients undergoing trial of labour after caesarean section (TOLAC) is also increasing. Three professional societies provide detailed guidelines based on scientific evidence for the management of patients attempting vaginal birth after caesarean section (VBAC). However, they do not provide any recommendations ...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
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Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: State ‐of‐the‐art review Source Type: research
AbstractIntroductionLarge observational studies have shown that obstetric and perinatal outcomes are negatively affected in obese women. In contrast, a recent Dutch randomized trial of infertile women and lifestyle weight intervention found no difference between the weight intervention group and the control group in obstetric or neonatal outcomes. We have recently published a large Nordic randomized trial where obese women scheduled for in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment went through an intensive weight intervention treatment before IVF. No significant effect on live birth rate was found, despite large weight loss in t...
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
ConclusionsOverall, there was no significant difference in birth defects resulting from IVF ‐ICSI with autologous or donor oocytes. Overall the births resulting from IVF‐ICSI pregnancies did not have a higher rate of birth defects compared to natural conceptions. The differences in the prevalence of certain birth defects (cardiovascular or central nervous system) reported in IVF‐ICSI pregnancies may be due to improved surveillance modalities and early detection in pregnancies following IVF‐ICSI. A study with larger number of sample size will give us better understanding of the prevalance of reported incidence in th...
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that 67% of men in infertile couples, who have strict sperm morphology between 5 and 14%, are found to have a potential contributing male factor infertility diagnosis. This raises the possibility that the new lower reference value for sperm morphology may result in missed opportunities for proper infertility assessment. PMID: 30602328 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Scand J Urol Source Type: research
AbstractIntroductionLarge observational studies have shown that obstetric and perinatal outcomes are negatively affected in obese women. In contrast, a recent Dutch randomized trial of infertile women and lifestyle weight intervention found no difference between the weight intervention group and the control group in obstetric or neonatal outcomes. We have recently published a large Nordic randomized trial where obese women scheduled for in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment went through an intensive weight intervention treatment prior to IVF. No significant effect on live birth rate was found, despite large weight loss in...
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
I am still not able to cope up with negative pregnancy test. I just wished that the test still comes positive. My good looking embryos do not like to settle in my good looking endometrium lining. I wish that I could know what these beautiful embryos wants more from me? Why all these medicines,efforts, patience, care, precautions and prayers for having a baby is not paying off. What else can we do to fulfill our dream to have a baby ?Crying is also not helping. After getting result, I spent entire day in reading positive ivf stories on internet I know that in this journey nobody get success immediately, every couple have th...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsWe optimized FACS protocol for simple and efficient isolation of single human sperm cells that subsequently enabled a successful genome-wide chromosome profiling and identification of segmental aneuploidies from these individual cells, following NGS analysis. This approach may be useful for analyzing semen samples of infertile men or chromosomal aberration carriers to facilitate the reproductive risk assessment.
Source: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
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