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Model Jessica Bennett left bed bound after medics failed to diagnose Lyme disease

Jessica Bennett, 31, of Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, suffered seizures, speech problems, hair loss, chronic insomnia and severe bloating due to Lyme disease she caught from a tick.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Experiencing sadness, anger, anxiety and other “negative” feelings can be hard. In fact, many of us just don’t do it. Because we’re afraid. We’ve “been taught that [negative emotions] are ‘not OK,’ that there is not a way to address them, or that they are not valid feelings,” said Britton Peters, a licensed mental health counselor in the state of Washington. Maybe when you cried, your caregivers told you to be quiet and get over it. Maybe they sent you to time-out. Maybe they told you to stop whining and be strong. Maybe your caregivers ignored or dismissed their own em...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Stress Emotional Control Fear Feelings Self-Doubt Source Type: blogs
Skin Appendage Disord
Source: Skin Appendage Disorders - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
To the Editor: We have read with interest the original article of Tolkachjov et  al regarding a case series of 7 men with frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA).1 This cicatricial alopecia might be misdiagnosed as several entities, such as traction alopecia, lichen planopilaris (LPP), Graham Little-Piccardi-Lassueur syndrome or even androgenetic alopecia. Therefore, we commend the authors for their proposal of diagnostic criteria for FFA1 based on the proposed criteria described by Kossard at al.2 Nevertheless, we would like to comment about these criteria.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: JAAD online Source Type: research
To the Editor: We thank Va ño-Galvan et al for their letter regarding criteria for frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA).1 The differential diagnosis of FFA is broad, and diagnostic criteria can aid in identifying this entity. We agree with many of the suggestions to our diagnostic criteria proposed in our article on the Mayo Cl inic cohort of FFA patients.2
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: JAAD online Source Type: research
To the Editor: A frontal band of scarring alopecia with eyebrow involvement in postmenopausal women (ie, frontal fibrosing alopecia [FFA]) evolved from a “recently described disease” to the status of “a growing epidemic” in less than 2 decades. Since the first report by Kossard,1 additional features and variants not contemplated in the original description have been incorporated into the clinical picture. For such, I read with great interest the paper by Rossi et al reporting 3 unusual clinical patterns of FFA.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: JAAD online Source Type: research
This study was a retrospective case-control study from the National Health Insurance Service –National Sample Cohort.3 Age, sex, location, income, and diagnostic codes based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition were retrieved.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Research letter Source Type: research
This study aimed to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between vitamin D levels and AA.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Research letter Source Type: research
To the Editor: Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a cicatricial alopecia affecting the frontal and temporal hairlines.1 The incidence of this condition is increasing, and currently, little is known about the  likelihood of stabilization, factors affecting prognosis, and the preferred treatment approach.2-4 With institutional review board approval, we reviewed the records of FFA patients with at least 3 months of follow-up and tracked patient progress at each visit by assessing hairline measurements (f rom the outer canthi or glabella to frontal hairline) and using trichoscopy (100× magnification).
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Research letter Source Type: research
To the Editor: Diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) immunotherapy is widely used in the treatment of alopecia areata (AA).1 Few studies have described the efficacy of DPCP maintenance treatment (DPCP-MT), and the relapse rate (RR) varies.2-4 Therefore, we  sought to clarify whether DPCP-MT prevents recurrence and to identify associated variables.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Research letter Source Type: research
Many therapies are available for the treatment of alopecia areata, including topical, systemic, and injectable modalities. However, these treatment methods produce variable clinical outcomes and there are no currently available treatments that induce and sustain remission. When making management decisions, clinicians must first stratify patients into pediatric versus adult populations. Disease severity should then be determined (limited vs extensive) before deciding the final course of therapy. The second article in this continuing medical education series describes the evidence supporting new treatment methods, among them...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Continuing medical education Source Type: research
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