Colonization of bacteria after lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients occurs early but does not impact survival

Conclusion: Colonization of bacteria in the lower airways occurs at a median of 23 days after transplantation in CF patients. In this population overall survival was not influenced by time to colonization or type of bacteria present.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: 7.3 Cystic Fibrosis Source Type: research

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Abstract Ramachandran conformational energy maps have been prepared for all of the glycosidic linkages found in the C1576 exopolysaccharide that constitutes the biofilms of the bacterial species Burkholderia multivorans, a member of the Burkholderia cepacian complex that was isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient. This polysaccharide is a rhamnomannan with a tetrasaccharide repeat unit containing two mannose residues and two rhamnose residues, -[3-α-D-Man-(1→2)- α -D-Man-(1→2)- α -D-Rha-(1→3)- α -D-Rha-(1→]n-, where approximately 50% of the rhamnoses are randomly methyl...
Source: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Int J Biol Macromol Source Type: research
We report the heterologous expression, structure, and antimicrobial activity of a lasso peptide, ubonodin, encoded in the genome of Burkholderia ubonensis . The topology of ubonodin is unprecedented amongst lasso peptides with 18 of its 28 amino acids found in the mechanically-bonded loop segment. Ubonodin inhibits RNA polymerase in vitro and has potent antimicrobial activity against several pathogenic members of the Burkholderia genus, most notably B. cepacia and B. multivorans , causative agents of lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID: 31765515 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Chembiochem - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Chembiochem Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: The Brief Case Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: The Brief Case Source Type: research
Conclusion: In this study the prevalence of fungal colonization seems to be lower than expected and no correlation with disease severity or CFTR function was found.Clinical Implications: The positive association with bacterial colorization is possibly part of the complex microbial interaction pathway requiring further clinical research. The positive tendency between fungal colonization and cystic fibrosis-liver disease is interesting and may underline a phenotypic correlation.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Cystic fibrosis Source Type: research
Conclusions: Thus far there is no difference in efficacy comparing disinfection techniques. Investigation continues to determine if this is true for all isolates in our collection. Any recommended disinfection practice utilized by CF patients has to be effective for the phenotypically diverse pathogens encountered in the CF lung.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Cystic fibrosis Source Type: research
Conclusions: The pattern of airway colonisation in the Indian setting is different from the Caucasian population, and P. aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex appear early. Colonisation with P. aeruginosa benefits from therapy. In case of infection, care must be taken while initiating empiric therapy. It should be based on local antibiograms to prevent the emergence of resistant microbes.
Source: Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Burkholderia cepacia complex is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing chronic pulmonary infections. These studies were conducted to demonstrate the activity of aerosolized levofloxacin in a chronic mouse lung infection model caused by B. cepacia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients. Treatment with aerosolized levofloxacin for four days produced at least one log CFU of bacterial killing against all strains tested and suggests possible utility in the treatment of lung infections caused by B. cepacia. PMID: 31712215 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Antimicrob Agents Chemother Source Type: research
Burkholderia cenocepacia is a human opportunistic pathogen causing devastating symptoms in patients suffering from immunodeficiency and cystic fibrosis. Out of the 303 B. cenocepacia strains with available genome...
Source: BMC Genomics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) harbor lifelong respiratory infections that are typically polymicrobial. The most frequently cultured bacteria from CF airways are Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus spp., Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter spp., Burkholderia cepacia complex, and non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria [1]. Recently, a growing body of CF respiratory microbiome literature has identified additional bacterial taxa present in CF respiratory secretions, including many genera containing anaerobic species like Prevotella spp.
Source: Journal of Cystic Fibrosis - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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