Why many generic drugs are becoming so expensive

The high cost of prescription drugs is big news. You hear about it on television, in your doctor’s office, and even on the campaign trail. When you think about expensive drugs, you may think about novel therapies for lung cancer or hepatitis C. But in fact, prices are also skyrocketing for the generic versions of some commonly prescribed drugs. An article published last year in The New England Journal of Medicine reported that between 2012 and 2013, captopril — a generic drug used to treat high blood pressure and heart failure — increased in price from 1 cent to 40 cents per pill. During this same period, the cost of doxycycline, an older antibiotic, increased from 6 cents to $3.36 per pill. Connecture, a health insurance information technology company, reports that while the price of most generic drugs remained constant between 2008 and 2015, almost 400 generics saw price increases of more than 1,000%. At a time when 18% of prescription drug costs are paid for out-of-pocket and 8% of Americans report not taking their medications in order to save money, such dramatic increases in generic drug prices place a heavy burden on public health. Why are generics going up in price? Most of us think of generics as the less expensive alternative to the brand-name version of a prescription drug — and that’s often the case. The pharmaceutical companies that make generics can sell them for lower prices because they didn’t have to pay for the research and...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health generic drugs generics medications Source Type: news

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Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
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