Infertility Patients Who Cross Borders for CareInfertility Patients Who Cross Borders for Care

Should doctors offer infertility treatment to patients who cross international borders to get care they can't legally receive in their home country? Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

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Update Writing in the October 10, 2018 New England Journal of Medicine, Eve Rittenberg, MD, assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and practicing physician at Brigham and Women’s Fish Center for Women’s Health, reflects on the impact the Kavanaugh hearing and #MeToo movement have had on patients who have experienced sexual violence. Important principles of trauma-informed care—including ways to ask permission, offer control, and find support—described in her article and in Monique Tello’s post below can make a real difference to many women and health care professionals alike. ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Health care Managing your health care Source Type: blogs
​BY GREGORY TAYLOR, DO, &FRANK SCHELL, DOA 30-year-old woman presented to the ED complaining of pelvic pain. She said she felt an acute onset of sharp lower right pelvic pain during intercourse two days earlier. The pain continued to worsen, becoming diffuse. She was also experiencing nausea, vomiting, malaise, anorexia, and vaginal spotting. She had no history or concern for sexually transmitted disease, and had no fever or vaginal discharge. She had had a previous Cesarean section and bilateral tubal ligation.Her vital signs were a heart rate of 110 bpm, a respiratory rate of 25 bpm, a blood pressure of 113/88 mm H...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
Rehana Rehman, Salima Lalani, Mukhtiar Baig, Iman Nizami, Zohaib Rana, Zohair Jamil Gazzaz
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
There is no acceptable scientific evidence that chiropractors can treat Alzheimer's disease, cancer, diabetes, infertility, infections, autism, ADHD or Down syndrome. And yet, some practitioners in this province claim they can.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/British Columbia Source Type: news
Discussion Cryptorchidism is the failure of one or both testes to descend from the abdomen into the scrotum. Congenital undescended testis (UDT)is common in young infants (1-4% in term infants and 45% in preterm infants) in that the testes will be palpable but remain high, but most testes will descend by 3-6 months and by 9 months of age only 1% remain undescended. The scrotum often appears underdeveloped. Sometimes the testes cannot be identified and is intra-abdominal at birth. Intra-abdominal testes are less likely to migrate to the scrotum and therefore are more likely to remain undescended. Acquired undescended test...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
ConclusionsThe rate of exposure to violence was determined to be high in women included in the study. The most common type of domestic violence is psychological violence.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Cryptorchidism as a common genitourinary malformation with the serious complication of male infertility draws widespread attention. With several reported miRNAs playing critical roles in spermatogonial stem ce...
Source: Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Scientists may soon be able to create human sperm and eggs using ordinary cells – a boon for those with fertility problems that raises troubling ethical questionsForty years ago, couples suffering from infertility were given hope by the birth of Louise Brown, the first “test-tube baby”. But although millions of babies have now been born by IVF, the technique can offer no help to couples eager to have a child that is genetically theirs but who lack the eggs or sperm to make it: men whose testes produce no sperm, say, or women who have undergone surgery for ovar ian cancer. Some opt for donor eggs or sperm,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Genetics Reproduction Fertility problems IVF Biology Science Health Society Source Type: news
This study investigated the quality and quantity of eggs and embryos as well as the clinical pregnancy outcome in young infertile women with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) after in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI). MATERIAL AND METHODS We retrospectively reviewed records of 4285 infertile women and divided them into 3 groups according to age and ovarian reserve: young women with normal ovarian reserve (n=1695), young women with DOR (n=1121), and older women with DOR (n=1469). RESULTS In young women with DOR, the proportion of high-quality embryos was significantly higher than in older women...
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
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