Fatty liver disease and scarring have strong genetic component

Hepatic fibrosis, which involves scarring of the liver that can result in dysfunction and, in severe cases, cirrhosis and cancer, may be as much a consequence of genetics as environmental factors.
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - Category: Science Source Type: news

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CONCLUSION: Periodontal disease and tooth loss are positively associated with liver diseases including NAFLD, elevated transaminase level, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. PMID: 32621350 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Clinical Periodontology - Category: Dentistry Authors: Tags: J Clin Periodontol Source Type: research
Authors: Lefere S, Devisscher L, Geerts A Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent liver disease worldwide, and an increasing cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is a key pathophysiological mechanism contributing to NAFLD progression. Major triggers for angiogenesis in NAFLD include tissue hypoxia, structural and dynamic endothelial cell dysfunction, stellate cell activation and macrophage-mediated inflammation. In turn, angiogenesis drives inflammation and is closely linked to the progression...
Source: Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Acta Gastroenterol Belg Source Type: research
Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most prevalent liver disease worldwide. NAFLD is tightly linked to the metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and oxidative stress. Globally, its inflammatory form, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), has become the main cause of liver related morbidity and mortality, mainly due to liver cirrhosis and primary liver cancer. One hallmark of NASH are changes in mitochondrial morphology and function that are accompanied by a blocked flow of electrons in the respiratory chain, which increases formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in a self-p...
Source: American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology - Category: Physiology Authors: Tags: Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol Source Type: research
In conclusion, emodin has a good effect on liver protection, but further experimental data are needed to verify it. PMID: 32553811 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Journal of Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Eur J Pharmacol Source Type: research
Abstract Chronic liver disease progresses through several stages, fatty liver, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and eventually, it leads to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) over a long period of time. Since a large proportion of patients with HCC are accompanied by cirrhosis, it is considered to be an important factor in the diagnosis of liver cancer. This is because cirrhosis leads to an irreversible harmful effect, but the early stages of chronic liver disease could be reversed to a healthy state. Therefore, the discovery of biomarkers that could identify the early stages of chronic liver disease is important to preven...
Source: BMB Reports - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: BMB Rep Source Type: research
co Giannini Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most frequent primary liver cancer, is the sixth most common cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and accounts globally for about 800,000 deaths/year. Early detection of HCC is of pivotal importance as it is associated with improved survival and the ability to apply curative treatments. Chronic liver diseases, and in particular cirrhosis, are the main risk factors for HCC, but the etiology of liver disease is rapidly changing due to improvements in the prevention and treatment of HBV (Hepatitis B virus) and HCV (Hepatitis C virus) infect...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Role of γδT cells in liver diseases and its relationship with intestinal microbiota. World J Gastroenterol. 2020 May 28;26(20):2559-2569 Authors: Zhou QH, Wu FT, Pang LT, Zhang TB, Chen Z Abstract γδT cells are unconventional T lymphocytes that bridge innate and adaptive immunity. Based on the composition of T cell receptor and the cytokines produced, γδT cells can be divided into diverse subsets that may be present at different locations, including the liver, epithelial layer of the gut, the dermis and so on. Many of these cells perform specific functions in liver ...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Authors: Khneizer G, Rizvi S, Gawrieh S Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the leading liver disease globally. NAFLD patients can have a progressive phenotype, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) that could lead to cirrhosis, liver failure and cancer. There is a close bi-directional relationship between NAFLD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); NAFLD increases the risk for T2DM and its complications whereas T2DM increases the severity of NAFLD and its complications. The large global impact of NAFLD and T2DM on healthcare systems requires a paradigm shift from specialty care to early ...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by excessive storage of fatty acids in the form of triglycerides in hepatocytes. It is most prevalent in western countries and includes a wide range of clinical and histopathological findings, namely from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis and fibrosis, which may lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. The key event for the transition from steatosis to fibrosis is the activation of quiescent hepatic stellate cells (qHSC) and their differentiation to myofibroblasts. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), expressed by a plethora of immune cells...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of liver disease in the United States, and is estimated to affect up to a quarter of adults in the world. It is defined by excess fat accumulating in the liver and usually occurs in people with obesity, high blood sugars (diabetes), abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels, or high blood pressure. These disorders often run together and as a group are called metabolic syndrome. The “non-alcoholic” part of “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease” is important to distinguish it from alcohol-related liver disease, which can also cause excess liver...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Digestive Disorders Source Type: blogs
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