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How Big Could a World Record Pumpkin Get?

This article originally appeared on Inverse. By Ben Guarino Thanks to the efforts of Illinois farmer Gene McMullen, the North American record for the heaviest pumpkin now sits at 2,145 pounds. McMullen's Cucurbita Maxima Brobdingnag is the second greatest pumpkin the world has ever known, trailing only Beni Meier of Switzerland's monster fruit, which tipped the scales at 2,378 pounds in 2014. The most remarkable thing about these overachieving gourds is that their size is not singular: The weight of the massive pumpkin growth has been linear over the past few decades according to an analysis by University of Wisconsin-Madison horticulturalists. So, when does it hit critical mass? How high peak pumpkin can go is unclear. Purdue University botanist Dan Egel flatly refused to speculate on a theoretical upper bound for a pumpkin, invoking the parable of the 4-minute mile barrier: It couldn't be broken, until Roger Bannister ran 3:59.4 in 1954. "It's going up and up and up," says James Nienhuis, the UW-Madison horticulture professor who tasked a student with tracking the historical pumpkin weights. "I am astounded at how large they can get." Danny Dill was willing to get more specific. "Growers will continue breeding for thickness, thus weight," Dill tells Inverse. "Something that grew to the size, say 2,500 pounds, could someday weigh 3,000 pounds because it was so thick and dense." Dill knows a thing or two about giant squash. His father,...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Source: Pituitary - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
(University of California - Irvine) Researchers from the University of California, Irvine, Georgetown University and the University of Rochester have found that specific small molecules in blood plasma may be useful in determining whether someone has sustained a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), commonly known as a concussion.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
This study estimated the frequency and risk of Moderate-to-Maximal traumatic brain injuries sustained by occupants in motor vehicle crashes in the US. National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System crashes that occurred in years 2001–2015 with light vehicles produced 2001 or later were incorporated in the study. Crash type, crash severity, car model year, belt usage and occupant age and sex were controlled for in the analysis. The results showed that Moderate concussions account for 79% of all MAISbrain2+ injuries. Belted occupants were at lower risks than unbelted occupants for most brain injury c...
Source: Accident Analysis and Prevention - Category: Accident Prevention Source Type: research
The accurate identification of children with a concussion by emergency physicians is important to initiate appropriate anticipatory guidance and management.
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research
Patients with mild traumatic brain injury or concussion commonly present to the emergency department for assessment; providing patients with information on usual symptoms and their progression may encourage faster recovery.
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research
Even a mild brain injury may significantly increase risk, according to a new large study of U.S. veterans
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: While many districts reported success with ED-ID for TBI, responses to the ED-ID legislation and TBI category were mixed, with enough barriers identified to cause concern over whether the legislative and policy changes have been overall beneficial. PMID: 29660963 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: NeuroRehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: NeuroRehabilitation Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Allowing school districts to direct the application of existing ascending levels of educational support for students with concussion as they return to school can promote robust and positive outcomes. PMID: 29660962 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: NeuroRehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: NeuroRehabilitation Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The evidence supports the conclusion that it is likely that concussion causes autonomic nervous system anomalies. An awareness of this relationship increases our understanding of the physical impact of concussion, partially explains the overlap of concussion symptoms with other medical conditions, presents opportunities for further research, and has the potential to powerfully inform treatment decisions. PMID: 29660949 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: NeuroRehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: NeuroRehabilitation Source Type: research
(Reuters Health) - A new study of hundreds of thousands of U.S. armed forces veterans concludes that banging your head severely enough to lose consciousness can dramatically increase the risk of Parkinson's, the brain disease marked by tremors, slow movements, balance problems and difficulty walking.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
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