Invisible Illness or Chronic Illness? What's the Difference?

Why do we say we have an "invisible illness"? Is is because we feel invisible to people? Years ago the term "invisible illness" was rarely used. Before social media the opportunity to talk about your disease was relegated to a local support group and perhaps a caring friend or two. Illness was something you spoke to your doctor about... and that was all. I became an online illness advocate when I built my first website for those with chronic illness in 1996. As the Internet has evolved from news groups to social media, much has changed. But I have seen one continual thread: people are eager to share about their illness experiences and gain both understanding and wisdom from their peers. I established Invisible Illness Awareness Week in 2002. Why? I saw an overwhelming amount of people who were coping with their disease itself -- the symptoms, progression, medications, and medical care. But when it came to how it impacted their lives -- most specifically their relationships, they were struggling. Asking, "Who am I with this illness?" If you have a chronic condition you may have shared one of the many illness memes on social media that attempt to explain what it is like to live with constant pain. The conversations that occur in blog comments or other platforms naturally take on an "us" vs. "them" mentality. We who are ill consider ourselves part of a exclusive club -- one we never wished to join. And it is difficult to believe...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

Publication date: September 2018Source: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism Reports, Volume 16Author(s): Maria Bleier, Nataliya Yuskiv, Tina Priest, Marioara Angela Moisa Popurs, Sylvia Stockler-Ipsiroglu, BC Children's Hospital, The University of British ColumbiaAbstractMorquio B disease (MBD) or Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV B (MPS IV B) is caused by particular GLB1 mutations specifically affecting the affinity of beta-galactosidase to keratan sulphate, resulting in dysostosis multiplex resembling Morquio A (MPS IV A) disease (GALNS deficiency). Additional neuronopathic features of GM1 II/III (juvenile/adult) gangliosidosi...
Source: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism Reports - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
This study aimed to analyze the relationship between adult ADHD and risky riding behavior of motorcyclists.Methods: The community-based cross-sectional study was run on 340 motorcyclists in Bukan, during 2015 and 2016, using a cluster-random sampling in 7 areas of the city. Using the city map provided by Bukan ’s Health Center, the city was divided into 14 clusters according to the areas covered by health centers. Then, 7 clusters (out of 14) were selected randomly. To achieve the anticipated sample size, the data was collected from these 7 clusters. In this study, the data collection instruments were: standard Motor...
Source: Journal of Injury and Violence Research - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
By SAURABH JHA Medical Imaging and the Price of Corn After the Napoleonic wars, the price of corn in England became unaffordable. The landowners were blamed for the high price, which some believed was a result of the unreasonably high rents for farm land. Economist David Ricardo disagreed. According to Ricardo, detractors had the directionality wrong. It was the scarcity of corn (the high demand relative to its supply) that induced demand for the most fertile land. That is, the rent did not increase the price of corn. The demand for corn raised the rent. Rent was a derived demand. Directionality is important. Getting direc...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 20 July 2018Source: The Lancet Respiratory MedicineAuthor(s): Sanjeevan Muruganandan, Maree Azzopardi, Deirdre B Fitzgerald, Ranjan Shrestha, Benjamin C H Kwan, David C L Lam, Christian C De Chaneet, Muhammad Redzwan S Rashid Ali, Elaine Yap, Claire L Tobin, Luke A Garske, Phan T Nguyen, Christopher Stanley, Natalia D Popowicz, Christopher Kosky, Rajesh Thomas, Catherine A Read, Charley A Budgeon, David Feller-Kopman, Nick A MaskellSummaryBackgroundIndwelling pleural catheters are an established management option for malignant pleural effusion and have advantages over talc slurry pleurode...
Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to examine the usefulness of these less invasive small-bore aspiration catheters for drainage of pneumothorax.MethodsBaseline characteristics and laboratory test data at admission of 70 patients who were admitted to and underwent drainage treatment for pneumothorax at our hospital between April 2011 and February 2017 were retrospectively reviewed based on their medical records. The primary endpoints were factors associated with drainage treatment failure, and baseline characteristics and laboratory test data were compared between those treated with a small-bore aspiration catheter and those ...
Source: Respiratory Investigation - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 July 2018Source: PM&RAuthor(s): William A. Berrigan, Curtis Whitehair, Richard ZorowitzAbstractDry needling is a procedure commonly performed for the relief of myofascial pain disorders. The procedure is generally well tolerated. Adverse events often are mild, but severe complications have been reported. This case report describes an acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of dry needling. It is a reminder to the performing physician or therapist to take specific precautions when placing a needle near the spine. Sudden onset of neuropathic pain post-needling therapy in and aro...
Source: PMandR - Category: Rehabilitation Source Type: research
We present a 31 year-old woman with T3 AIS A spinal cord injury who developed recurrent AD while receiving duloxetine and amitriptyline combination therapy for neuropathic pain. After excluding other AD generators, duloxetine was discontinued and the AD episodes resolved. While secondary hypertension is a known side effect of amitriptyline and duloxetine, neither drug has been previously associated with AD. One potential mechanism for inhibition of duloxetine metabolism is discussed. Unexplained AD in at-risk patients receiving duloxetine and amitriptyline should prompt consideration of an adverse reaction to combination therapy.
Source: PMandR - Category: Rehabilitation Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 July 2018Source: Journal of NeuroradiologyAuthor(s): Halil Onder, Ilknur Aydin, Mahmut Apaydin
Source: Journal of Neuroradiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 July 2018Source: Journal of the American College of RadiologyAuthor(s): Celena Romero, Ryan Lee
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
We present a case of 20-year-old woman who presented with a large pedunculated skin covered mass lesion arising from the left thigh, measuring 40  × 25 cm, with no history of pain or skin ulceration and a feeling of a lump with dragging pain in the left side of the abdomen for about 7 years. Subsequently, ultrasound, contrast-enhanced computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging of abdomen and left thigh region were carried out. The lesion was broad-based toward the left upper thigh with a central core of interspersed fat supplied by branches of the superficial and deep femoral arteries...
Source: Skeletal Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
More News: ADHD | Arthritis | Back Pain | Blogging | Chemistry | Children | Chronic Pain | Health | Hypertension | Infertility | Internet | Men | Neurology | Neurosurgery | Pain | Reproduction Medicine | Rheumatoid Arthritis | Rheumatology | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | Stroke | Websites