5 Things to Never Say to a Woman Dealing With Infertility

By Catherine DiBenedetto Before she had her first baby in 2011, Zahie El Kouri went through multiple rounds of IVF and suffered several miscarriages. She knows just how lonely it can feel to navigate fertility issues--but the writer from Austin, Texas, also knows the value of family and friends who offer a listening ear and kind words along the way. The love she received on her path to parenthood inspired her to write Don't Tell Her to Relax ($10, amazon.com). Below, we've pulled five tips from her book on what not to say to your infertile loved one (ILO). RELATED: 15 Factors That Affect a Woman's Fertility "The minute you stop trying, you'll get pregnant" You want to ease your ILO's anxiety, and provide a dose of optimism. But telling her to relax doesn't have that effect, El Kouri explains. To a woman panicked about her ability to have a child, a "chill out" directive can sound glib and insensitive. Infertility is a medical condition--and adopting a carefree attitude won't remedy the underlying causes. A better way to show your support is to ask about her fertility treatments, El Kouri writes, and let her know you're there for her whenever she wants to talk. "I just know you'll be a mother soon" It may be especially tempting to say this when your ILO is in the middle of an IVF cycle. But promising motherhood isn't fair when there are no guarantees, El Kouri points out. "In fact, depending on several factors, there's actually less than a 50...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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You couldn’t get pregnant easily, and needed fertility treatments. You had a miscarriage. Or several. You developed complications during your pregnancy. You delivered your baby preterm. Every single one of Parijat Deshpande’s clients feels like their bodies have betrayed them because of the above reasons. Deshpande, MS, is a perinatal mind-body wellness counselor and high-risk pregnancy expert, who helps women navigate stress so they can manage pregnancy complications and give their baby a strong start to life. Psychologist Julie Bindeman, PsyD, works with women struggling with reproductive challenges, depressi...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Women's Issues Betrayal Fertility miscarriage Parenthood Pregnancy Source Type: blogs
This study included women between the ages of 16 and 45 with a first pregnancy terminated by spontaneous abortion between January 2007 and December 2015 (index date). These women were followed in 262 gynecological practices. Women with a spontaneous abortion were matched (1:1) with pregnant women without spontaneous abortion by age, index year, diagnosis of female infertility prior to the index date, procreative management prior to the index date, and physician.
Source: Psychiatry Research - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractMonitoring subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) in women is believed to be important in terms of preventing overt hypothyroidism and optimizing the health and cognitive development of their children. Current systematic reviews have suggested an association between maternal SCH and adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes. However, initiating the administration of thyroxine during pregnancy has failed to demonstrate appreciable health benefits. Hence there are calls by professional endocrine societies for optimizing serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels pre-conception. The strategy of ensuring that serum TSH lev...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
A powerful photo series is highlighting the anguish of infertility. Las Vegas photographer Abbie Fox captured stunning images of local optician Victoria Hamilton to illustrate the painful journeys they’ve followed in their personal lives. Both women have struggled with infertility. Fox had a miscarriage last March after two healthy pregnancies and births and was eventually diagnosed with PCOS, which dashed her dream of having four children.  “We have two amazing children and after this last year I have sort of given up the idea of having another child,” Fox told HuffPost. “It just wasn&rsq...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
By Katrina Mark, MD 1. Fertility naturally declines as we age That alone doesn’t mean you should start to worry. The general advice I give a woman is if she has been trying to become pregnant for a full year with no luck, she might consider a fertility evaluation. For a woman over age 35, she might consider it after six months. If a woman is younger and has irregular periods, it’s likely she isn’t regularly ovulating, so she might want to be evaluated sooner. 2. Sometimes there’s a reason for infertility – and sometimes, there’s not There are some things we know cause infertility. About...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Health Tips Women's Health fertility Katrina Mark obgyn UMMC Source Type: blogs
In the three years that Thomas Smialek and his wife Sara have been trying to have a baby, they’ve endured two miscarriages and multiple failed infertility treatments. But this latest round of in-vitro fertilization, or IVF, has been especially challenging. Not only are they shelling out thousands of dollars in insurance co-pays and taking time off work to drive three hours round trip from their home in Marion, Illinois to their fertility clinic appointments in St. Louis, but Smialek, 33, can’t shake the feeling of being left out. While his wife and their doctor seem to talk over him during their conversations a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
I never faced any major disappointments in my life, be it my family, friends, education or career, the first time i experienced one was in the form of miscarriage of an early pregnancy immediately after marriage and then never conceiving naturally  for several  years thereafter . It was emotionally very draining to accept that life can be so harsh on you. There is always an expectation that since i conceived  once, it may happen once again naturally. But all the efforts went without any positive results .I started thinking of medical options, initially i did not understand the significance of choice of docto...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
Conclusions The findings of this study evidence that in case of frozen-thawed single euploid blastocyst transfer, both protocols are equally effective in terms of clinical outcomes, cost-benefit, and patient compliance. The choice of endometrial preparation protocol should be based on women menstrual and ovulatory characteristics or otherwise on patient need for cycle planning. Trial registration www.clinicaltrials.gov with number NCT02378584
Source: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
This article summarizes the literature on obstetric and gynecologic complications associated with eating disorders. MethodWe performed a comprehensive search of the current literature on obstetric and gynecologic complications associated with eating disorders using PubMed. More recent randomized‐controlled trials and larger data sets received priority. We also chose those that we felt would be the most relevant to providers. ResultsCommon obstetric and gynecologic complications for women with eating disorders include infertility, unplanned pregnancy, miscarriage, poor nutrition during pregnancy, having a baby with small ...
Source: International Journal of Eating Disorders - Category: Eating Disorders and Weight Management Authors: Tags: Critical Analysis and Synthesis Source Type: research
Have you been trying to get pregnant with no success? I've been there. You are not alone. Infertility affects more and more couples each year. According to the Centers for Disease Control, as of 2010 about 6.7 million American women suffer from infertility. Infertility is defined as as the inability to conceive after one year of well-timed, unprotected intercourse (or after six months if the woman is over 35) or the inability to carry a viable pregnancy to live birth. It's important to remember that having infertility isn't just about not being able to conceive, but it also represents the inability to stay pregnant as we...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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