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Brazilian Wasp's Venom Could Be A Powerful 'Weapon Against Cancer,' Study Shows

Toxic, but life-saving? It seems like an oxymoron, but scientists say the venom of Polybia paulista, a wasp native to Brazil, fits that description.  According to a study published in the Biophysical Journal this week, the wasp’s venom contains a toxin, named MP1, that selectively destroys tumor cells without harming normal ones. The BBC called the venom a potentially powerful “weapon against cancer.”  In lab tests, MP1 was found to inhibit the growth of prostate and bladder cancer cells as well as leukemia cells that had been shown to be resistant to a variety of other drugs. The toxin interacts with fatty molecules known as lipids that are found on the outside of cancer cell membranes, researchers said. It then disrupts the structure of the protective membranes, creating “gaping holes” that allow molecules critical to the survival of the cancer cell to leak out. Study co-author Dr. João Neto of Brazil’s São Paulo State University said these “large” holes take “only seconds” to form. Since healthy cells don’t have these lipids on the outside (they are located on the cell's inner membrane), it seems they are not susceptible to the wasp toxin the way cancer cells are.  “Cancer therapies that attack the lipid composition of the cell membrane would be an entirely new class of anticancer drugs,” Paul Beales, one of the study’s authors, stated in a news releas...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Conclusions The burden of tobacco-related cancer hospitalizations is substantial in the U.S. These findings highlight the importance of tobacco prevention and cessation efforts to decrease the burden of tobacco-related cancers in the U.S.
Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 March 2018 Source:Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology Author(s): Marzena Matejczyk, Grzegorz Świderski, Renata Świsłocka, Stanisław Józef Rosochacki, Włodzimierz Lewandowski The most important problems of anti-cancer therapy include the toxicity of the drugs applied to healthy cells and the multi-drug cells resistance to chemotherapeutics. One of the most commonly used anticancer drugs is doxorubicin (DOX) used to treat certain leukemias and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, as well as bladder, breast, stomach, lung, ovarian, thyroid, multiple myeloma and other ...
Source: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
ConclusionWe predicted continuing falls in mortality rates from major cancer sites in the EU and its major countries to 2018. Exceptions are pancreatic cancer and lung cancer in women. Improved treatment and —above age 50 years—organized screening may account for recent favourable colorectal cancer trends.
Source: Annals of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
In conclusion, cancer-related death was as common as cardiovascular death in these patients; moreover, cancer-related deaths occurred at substantially higher rates than in the general population. Strategies are needed to care for and counsel patients with cancer who experience AKI.
Source: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Clinical Epidemiology Source Type: research
This study sought to investigate outdoor air pollution from waste gas emission effects on multiple cancer incidences in a retrospective population-based study in Shanghai, China. Trends in cancer incidence for males and females and trends in waste gas emissions for the total waste gas, industrial waste gas, other waste gas, SO2, and soot were investigated between 1983 and 2010 in Shanghai, China. Regression models after adjusting for confounding variables were constructed to estimate associations between waste gas emissions and multiple cancer incidences in the whole group and stratified by sex, Engel coefficient, life exp...
Source: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int Source Type: research
Authors: Huang L, He K, Wang J, Yan J, Jiang Y, Wei Z, Zhang J, Li G, Huang D Abstract Eukaryotic translation initiation factors 3B (eIF3b) is a subtype of the eIF3 category, which has been verified to be over-expressed in colon cancer, bladder, prostate cancers and glioblastoma due to its impact on the cellular activity of cancer cells. However, no related research on exploring the correlation of eIF3b gene expression with cell proliferation and apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been conducted until now. Our study showed that the expression of eIF3b mRNA in CML patients was higher compared with nonma...
Source: Oncology Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncol Res Source Type: research
Purpose of review Recurrent loss of function mutations within genes of the cohesin complex have been identified in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). STAG2 is the most commonly mutated cohesin member in AML as well as solid tumors. STAG2 is recurrently, mutated in Ewing's Sarcoma, bladder cancer, and glioblastoma, and is one of only ten genes known to be recurrently mutated in over four distinct tissue types of human cancer Recent findings The cohesin complex, a multiprotein ring, is canonically known to align and stabilize replicated chromosomes prior to cell division. Although initially...
Source: Current Opinion in Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: MYELOID DISEASE: Edited by Martin S. Tallman Source Type: research
In this report, we review the up-to-date findings of more potency roles of silibinin in β-thalassemia (β-TM), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and multiple myelomas (MM) therapy and attempt to clarify the mechanisms underlying its effects. There are two viewpoints: First, The functional mechanisms of silibinin in AML cells via regulating cell differentiation to exert anti-cancer effect; Second, combination treatment strategy may be a good choice. PMID: 29179521 [PubMed]
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
(OAKLAND, Calif.) — Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person’s DNA to try to cure a disease. The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spot. “It’s kind of humbling” to be the first to test this, said Madeux, who has a metabolic disease called Hunter syndrome. “I’m willing to take that risk. Hopefully it will help me and other people.” Signs of whether i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized gene editing Genetics health Innovation onetime overnight Research Source Type: news
BACKGROUNDThe improving efficacy of cancer treatment has resulted in an increasing array of treatment‐related symptoms and associated burdens imposed on individuals undergoing aggressive treatment of their disease. Often, clinical trials compare therapies that have different types, and severities, of adverse effects. Whether rated by clinicians or patients themselves, it can be difficult to know which side effect profile is more disruptive or bothersome to patients. A simple summary index of bother can help to adjudicate the variability in adverse effects across treatments being compared with each other. METHODSAcross 4 ...
Source: Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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