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Research Using Fetal Tissue

Hello HuffPo! Some of you may know me from junkscience.com or healthnewsdigest.com. My main focus here will be on science, or what passes for science these days. Many people of good will are not aware that our government spends more than $400 billion per year on R &D. Regrettably, a substantial amount of that ends of being little more than a form of academic welfare, for research that has almost no chance of ever leading to anything practical, and in many cases does not even add to so-called "basic knowledge." By way of example (and I will have many more), let's take a look at a current hot topic: Research using fetal tissue. This is hardly a new phenomenon. Fetal tissue has been harvested for medical research for years. Even before abortion was legalized, other sources were tapped, and according to an article by AP science writer Malcolm Ritter, this practice dates back to the 1930s. Ritter, and many others, like to invoke the 1954 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. As Ritter puts it, "The 1954 Nobel Prize in medicine was awarded for work with fetal tissue that led to developing a vaccine against polio." Not so fast... According to the Nobel Foundation, that particular prize was awarded jointly to John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller, and Frederick Chapman Robbins "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue." Indeed, many types of tissue were used besides human embryo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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China's childhood hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination programme is a great public health success, resulting in a prevalence of HBsAg of only 1% in children under 5 years. However, the burden of HBV infection in China is still the highest in the world, with one third of the world's 240 million people with chronic HBV living in China.1 Nevertheless, most people with HBV infection in China are unaware that they carry the disease, making HBV infection a truly silent epidemic.2
Source: LANCET - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
The 2017 –18 influenza season in the northern hemisphere was notably intense, similar to the immediately preceding season in the southern hemisphere. A likely factor influencing the intensity of these seasons was the effectiveness of the influenza vaccine both in terms of the matching of the components of the vaccine to the dominant circulating strains and the ability of these individual components to elicit protection. A universal influenza vaccine, which would offer broad and long-lasting protection, would overcome the shortcomings of the current cat-and-mouse approach.
Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
On March 7, 2018, four cases in human beings of encephalitis associated with Borna disease virus 1 infection were reported in Germany, including three deaths. Of the four patients, three had received organs from the same donor who had no clinical signs of the illness, two of these recipients died from their illness. An additional case of encephalitis caused by Borna disease virus 1 was identified in southern Germany, this patient also died from their illness. No epidemiological link was identified between this case and the organ transplant recipients.
Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Newsdesk Source Type: research
Findings from a study done in 12 cynomolgus macaques suggest that common immune responses to Ebola virus could serve as an early marker for infection. The monkeys, which were infected intranasally with Ebola virus, presented with varying times to disease onset, but about 4 days before fever began in each one, researchers noticed a distinctive upregulation of interferon-stimulating genes. Comparison with data from the 2014 –16 Ebola outbreak in Guinea showed activation of the same genes, in the same order, in human beings.
Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Newsdesk Source Type: research
Conclusions: We found no evidence of increased risk of subsequent asthma diagnosis among children younger than 3 years of age who received LAIV compared with placebo.
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
Conclusions: Maternal influenza immunization may reduce severe pneumonia episodes among infants—particularly those too young to be completely vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza.
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Erratum Source Type: research
Conclusion: While there was no difference in acquisition of VT nasopharyngeal carriage of pneumococcus in CLH and HUC after one dose of PCV13, earlier access to ART may impact response to PCV13 in CLH.
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV Reports Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Erratum Source Type: research
This study aimed to describe the pertussis epidemiology in the Puglia region in 2006–2015 and to identify recent polymorphisms in Bordetella pertussis virulence-associated genes. Methods: The pertussis cases in 2006–2015 were identified from the National Hospital Discharge Database and the Information System of Infectious Diseases. Samples of pertussis cases in 2014–2016 that were confirmed by the Regional Reference Laboratory were subjected to ptxA, ptxP and prn gene sequencing and, in 10 cases, multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis. Results: In Puglia in 2006–2015, the pertus...
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Vaccine Reports Source Type: research
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