3 months Post Transplant...

My boyfriend was transplanted Feb 24, 2013. He was at about 13% lung function at the time and was listed for about 8 months before transplant. He had one dry run around Thanksgiving of 2012. He was very hesitant about this whole process. In January of 2004 he got a bad case of pneumonia and was put in a medical induced coma. We live in Syracuse NY but he was transported to Boston during this time. he got put on the transplant list there. He was eventually taken off the list because he seemed to bounce back. After being hospitalized for about 6 months... He went back to his normal life.. Even playing recreational sports again. He wasn't o2 dependent until early 2012.. We knew it was time for reevaluation but this time at NY Presb. We went down (3.5 hour drive) for a normal check up and he ended up getting admitted and that's when he knew he had to be re-listed. When the surgery actually happened, things went great. He was transplanted on a Sunday and we left the hospital 16 days later. He was up and walking the 2nd day after surgery, other patients called him a show off. We are now running, mountain biking, and going to buy tennis rackets soon. Its really amazing. Eddie always second guessed getting a transplant because he always thought he would bounce back... Now he knows he wouldn't trade this new set of lungs for anything.
Source: Cystic Fibrosis Transplants Forum - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Transplants Source Type: forums

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ConclusionGiven the concern for MDR P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients, BT may offer a viable anti-infective adjunct to traditional antibiotic therapy.
Source: Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Mark E. Gray1,2*, James Meehan2,3, Paul Sullivan4, Jamie R. K. Marland4, Stephen N. Greenhalgh1, Rachael Gregson1, Richard Eddie Clutton1, Carol Ward2, Chris Cousens5, David J. Griffiths5, Alan Murray4 and David Argyle1 1The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom 2Cancer Research UK Edinburgh Centre and Division of Pathology Laboratories, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom 3School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Institute of Sensors, Signals and Systems, Heriot-Watt Univer...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
In this study they also showed PTX3 localized in NETs formed after neutrophil activation (5). Proteomics analysis revealed that PTX3 forms complexes with two anti-microbial proteins [azurocidin (AZU1) and myeloperoxidase (MPO)] associated to NETs (30). More recently, PTX3 localization in NETs has been confirmed, and the colocalization with AZU1 and MPO has been defined more accurately (31). Further investigation will be needed to understand the involvement of PTX3 interaction with AZU1 and MPO in their antibacterial role during NET formation. Regulation of Complement Activation PTX3 interaction with microorganisms is not...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
We describe the use of a decontamination protocol that allowed for successful lung transplantation in a patient with cystic fibrosis with necrotizing pneumonia from highly antibiotic-resistant pathogens (Burkholderia and Psuedomonas species). This strategy may allow for successful lung transplantation in patients with cystic fibrosis with multidrug-resistant infections previously considered nontransplantable.
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
We describe the use of a decontamination protocol that allowed for successful lung transplantation in a cystic fibrosis patient with necrotizing pneumonia from highly antibiotic-resistant pathogens (Burkholderia and psuedomonas species). This strategy may allow for successful lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis patients with multi-drug resistant infections previously considered non-transplantable.
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
We describe the use of a decontamination protocol that allowed for successful lung transplantation in a cystic fibrosis patient with necrotizing pneumonia from highly antibiotic-resistant pathogens (Burkholderia and psuedomonas species). This strategy may allow for successful lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis patients with multi-drug resistant infections previously considered non-transplantable. PMID: 30316849 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Ann Thorac Surg Source Type: research
We report the case of a 12-year-old girl with respiratory failure due to CF who underwent lung transplantation. She had been diagnosed with CF 8 years previously after being treated for recurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and malnutrition based on sweat chloride concentrations and the CFTR protein gene mutation test. Progression to end-stage lung disease and respiratory failure led to registration with the Korean Network for Organ Sharing. She underwent successful double lung transplantation in 2014. Although she has diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease, she has a better quality of life and a prolonged life ...
Source: Journal of Korean Medical Science - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: J Korean Med Sci Source Type: research
Conclusion: We propose that when CFA arrives at the airway, it rapidly adsorbs AMPs and creates negative complexes, thereby decreasing the functional amount of AMPs capable of killing pathogens. These results provide a novel translational insight into an early mechanism for how ambient PM increases the susceptibility of the airways to bacterial infection. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP876 Received: 27 July 2016 Revised: 30 December 2016 Accepted: 19 January 2017 Published: 05 July 2017 Address correspondence to A. P. Comellas, 6312 Pappajohn Biomedical Discovery Building. Newton Road, Iowa City, Iowa, USA, 52242; Teleph...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Staphylococcus aureus plays an important role in sepsis, pneumonia, wound infections, and cystic fibrosis (CF), which is caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr). Pulmonary S. aureus infections in CF often occur very early and prior to colonization with other pathogens, in particular Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here, we demonstrate that CF mice are highly susceptible to pulmonary infections with S. aureus and fail to clear the pathogen during infection. S. aureus is internalized by Cftr-deficient macrophages in the lung, but these macrophages are unable to kill intracellular bacteri...
Source: Infection and Immunity - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Cellular Microbiology: Pathogen-Host Cell Molecular Interactions Source Type: research
Sarah Demir, Julien Saison, Agathe Sénéchal, Jean-Francois MornexLung India 2017 34(1):85-87 A 40-year-old cystic fibrosis woman with a history of double-lung transplantation 2 years previously was admitted for a progressive respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed fever (39°C) and diffuse bilateral lung crackles. Laboratory findings included severe hypoxemia and inflammatory syndrome. Bronchoalveolar lavage and serological test were positive for mycoplasma pneumonia. As the patient did not improve after 3 days of antibiotics and donor-specific HLA antibodies had been detected, an acute antibody-...
Source: Lung India - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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