Music Therapy May Hold Promise For Treating Epilepsy

We know that listening to classical music can lower blood pressure, reduce stress levels and even boost learning. But could it also help prevent seizures in people with epilepsy?  Now that neurologists have found that the brains of people with epilepsy process music very differently than the brains of people without the condition, this may be a real possibility. The new research showed that when patients with epilepsy are listening to classical and jazz music, their brainwave patterns actually sync up with the melodies.  "Like musicians whose brains synchronize with music, persons with epilepsy synchronize to the music in the temporal lobe, where majority of seizures begin," Christine Charyton, Ph.D., a neurologist at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and one of the study's authors, told The Huffington Post in an email. The temporal lobe, the area of the brain above the ears where sound is perceived, is involved in both music processing and epilepsy. Roughly 80 percent of seizures originate in this area. Individuals with epilepsy tend to show abnormalities in the temporal and frontal cortexes of the brain, as well as abnormal synchronization of brainwave activity.  For the study, the neurologists used electroencephalogram (EEG) technology to record brainwave patterns of subjects with epilepsy and those without the condition. The participants' brainwave activity was recorded during a period of silence, and also while they w...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

Related Links:

In conclusion, the present study seems to confirm that music therapy may be an additional, nonpharmacological, effective treatment for patients with refractory epileptic seizures in childhood. The Mozart's set of different compositions can be better accepted and effective than the K448.
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
In this prospective, randomized, open label study, we compared the effect on seizure recurrence and quality-of-life parameters, of two different protocols of music therapy in children and adolescents with refractory epileptic encephalopathies. Nine out of ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news
In conclusion, the present study seems to confirm that music therapy may be an additional, nonpharmacological, effective treatment for patients with refractory epileptic seizures in childhood. The Mozart's set of different compositions can be better accepted and effective than the K448. PMID: 29182948 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Epilepsy and Behaviour - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Epilepsy Behav Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The quality of evidence for the comparisons of oral chloral hydrate against several other methods of sedation was very variable. Oral chloral hydrate appears to have a lower sedation failure rate when compared with oral promethazine for children undergoing paediatric neurodiagnostic procedures. The sedation failure was similar for other comparisons such as oral dexmedetomidine, oral hydroxyzine hydrochloride, and oral midazolam. When compared with intravenous pentobarbital and music therapy, oral chloral hydrate had a higher sedation failure rate. However, it must be noted that the evidence for the outcomes fo...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Review the complex relationship between music and epilepsy, from the promise of music therapy, to musicogenic epilepsy and potential effects of antiepileptics and epilepsy surgery on music perception.Practical Neurology
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights the need for well-designed randomised controlled trials conducted to assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions on seizure and behavioural outcomes in people with intellectual disabilities and epilepsy. PMID: 26355236 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
By studying brain wave activity, researchers noticed differences in how patients reacted to tunes
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
James Danna enters the Boston Children’s Hospital Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU) with the tools he’ll use to treat Joy, a 9-month-old patient recovering from open-heart surgery. Instead of a stethoscope or scalpel, James carries only small percussion instruments and a guitar. He gently opens the door to Joy’s room, taking a quick read of her heart rate—138. Joy is a tiny little thing in a great big bed, under bright lights and tethered to multiple machines. Over the course of her multiple procedures for a congenital heart defect, the noise of the monitors, air conditioning and loudspeakers have ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: All posts Heart conditions congenital heart defect Dr. Sitaram Emani Music therapy Source Type: news
Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, Ahead of Print.
Source: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics - Category: Neurology Tags: article Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2015 Source:Epilepsy & Behavior, Volume 50 Author(s): Giangennaro Coppola , Annacarmela Toro , Francesca Felicia Operto , Giuseppe Ferrarioli , Simone Pisano , Andrea Viggiano , Alberto Verrotti Mozart's sonata for two pianos in D major, K448, has been shown to decrease interictal EEG discharges and recurrence of clinical seizures in both adults and young patients. In this prospective, open-label study, we evaluated the effect of listening to a set of Mozart's compositions, according to the Tomatis method, on sleep quality and behavioral disorders, including auto-/hetero-aggression, irrita...
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
More News: Brain | Epilepsy | Learning | Music Therapy | Neurology | Neuroscience | Psychology | Science | Study | Universities & Medical Training | Websites