Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

A Cutting-Edge Fertility Technique For Pediatric Cancer Patients

CHICAGO (AP) -- Barely 2 years old, Talia Pisano is getting tough treatment for kidney cancer that spread to her brain. She's also getting a chance at having babies of her own someday.  To battle infertility sometimes caused by cancer treatment, some children's hospitals are trying a futuristic approach: removing and freezing immature ovary and testes tissue, with hopes of being able to put it back when patients reach adulthood and want to start families. No one knows yet if it will work. It has in adults - more than 30 babies have been born to women who had ovarian tissue removed in adulthood, frozen, and put back after treatment for cancer or other serious conditions. In lab animals, it's worked with frozen and thawed testes tissue. But the procedures are still experimental in children who haven't reached puberty, and too new to have been attempted. There are challenges to making immature eggs and sperm from removed tissue suitable for conception. Still, fertility researchers hope to refine the science while the first generation of children whose tissue has been put on ice grows up. Families like Talia's are clinging to that optimism. The dark-eyed toddler who loves princesses and play dough had an ovary removed and frozen in April. She was treated for kidney cancer last year but when it spread, doctors started harsher treatment including brain radiation. "It seemed very new and pretty amazing that we can do something like this and help her in a bigger way," ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

Related Links:

As the nation’s opioid epidemic rages on, the federal agency charged with leading the government’s response to substance abuse is changing the way it helps local communities. But critics say the move risks leaving programs with fewer resources until the new plan is in place. The controversy began in January with a low-key announcement by the […]Related:E. coli outbreak spreads as source of tainted lettuce remains a mysteryFirst marijuana-derived drug poised for FDA approval after winning support from advisersHave you or someone you know waited too long for an organ transplant?
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion: Our case report underlines the importance of active endoscopic surveillance of the remaining colon and rectum in patients with diverting stomas and inflammatory bowel disease in order to detect stenosis. If endoscopic control is not possible due to obliteration, surgical therapy must be discussed due to the risk of developing cancer.Case Rep Gastroenterol 2018;12:143 –146
Source: Case Reports in Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
[Malawi News Agency] Kasungu 18 April 2018: Minister of Health and Population, Atupele Muluzi says Government is committed to ensuring that maternal and infant mortality come to an end by the year 2030.
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - Category: OBGYN Source Type: news
Conclusions: This study is the first nationwide study presenting an increase in incidence of EP-NEC patients from 196 to 260 cases annually in the Netherlands. We found the best 5 year relative survival to be for EP-NEC patients with local disease located in the bladder, where the worst 5 year relative survival was found in the oesophagus.
Source: Neuroendocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Mauro Di Ianni, Stefano Baldoni, Beatrice Del Papa, Patrizia Aureli, Erica Dorillo, Filomena De Falco, Elisa Albi, Emanuela Varasano, Ambra Di Tommaso, Raffaella Giancola, Patrizia Accorsi, Gianluca Rotta, Chiara Rompietti, Estev ão Carlos Silva Barcelos, Antonio Francesco Campese, Paolo Di Bartolomeo, Isabella Screpanti, Emanuela Rosati, Franca Falzetti, Paolo Sportoletti
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Saghir Akhtar, Semir Vranic, Farhan Sachal Cyprian, Ala-Eddin Al Moustafa
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Karine A. Al Feghali, Rami A. Ballout, Assem M. Khamis, Elie A. Akl, Fady B. Geara
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Mayra A. Carrillo, Anjie Zhen, Scott G. Kitchen
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Lisanne Lutter, Julia Spierings, Femke C. C. van Rhijn-Brouwer, Jacob M. van Laar, Femke van Wijk
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
PROSTATE cancer symptoms can be hard to spot, especially in the early stages. As it progresses, signs of the disease can begin to show, and if the cancer grows outside of the prostate, and other symptoms can develop, including three related to sex.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Anemia | Babies | Boys | Brain | Brain Cancers | Brain Tumor | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Chemotherapy | Children | Girls | Hospitals | Infertility | Kidney Cancer | Kidney Transplant | Kidney Transplantation | Learning | Leukemia | Medical Ethics | Neurology | Ovarian Cancer | Ovaries | Pediatrics | Pregnancy | Reproduction Medicine | Science | Sickle Cell Anemia | Stem Cell Therapy | Stem Cells | Transplant Surgery | Transplants | Universities & Medical Training | Urology & Nephrology | Websites | Women