Seattle Flunks Vaccine Science

Nothing says First World city like Seattle does. Come for the cachet, stay for the Seahawks, and give a nod to the Starbucks and the Amazon and the mothership that is Microsoft just to the east. There’s nothing this so-hip-it-hurts town lacks, it seems—except perhaps for common sense. If you’re looking for that, the developing world is a far better bet. That’s the inescapable conclusion on what should be a very good week for public health—and childhood health in particular—with the World Health Organization and other groups announcing on July 24 that Nigeria has gone a full year without a single reported case of polio. Pending further certification, the country will be removed from the dwindling list of countries in which the disease is endemic, leaving just Pakistan and Afghanistan. If Nigeria’s caseload remains at zero for two more years, it will be officially declared polio free. How did the country that as recently as 1988 saw 30,000 children—a stadium’s worth—paralyzed or killed by polio every year achieve such a stunning turnaround? No surprise: vaccines—the same vaccines that have saved the lives and health of millions of children around the world, and the same vaccines that saw polio eradicated entirely in the U.S. in 1979. So it came as a head-slapping development that earlier this month, Seattle news outlets reported that polio vaccination rates in their city have hit a low of just 81.4%, or worse tha...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized anti-vaxxers Nigeria polio Seattle vaccines Source Type: news

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Publication date: 30 May 2020Source: New Scientist, Volume 246, Issue 3284Author(s): Alice Klein
Source: New Scientist - Category: Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 March 2020Source: Journal of Genetics and GenomicsAuthor(s): Gang Liu, Haijuan Xiao, Linlin Liu, Lingyun Guo, Ruolan Guo, Xuyun Hu, Chanjuan Hao, Jingang Gui, Weiwei Jiao, Fang Xu, Adong Shen, Wei Li
Source: Journal of Genetics and Genomics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Authors: Sekiguchi Y, Iizuka H, Takizawa H, Sugimoto K, Sakajiri S, Inano T, Fukuda Y, Shirane S, Hamano Y, Tomita S, Izumi H, Okubo M, Nakamura N, Sawada T, Sekiguchi N, Noguchi M Abstract A 53-year-old woman had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in X-6. She was started on methotrexate (MTX) in X-1. She developed a cough, and chest computed tomography showed abnormalities. In X, MTX was discontinued, but the cough persisted. A lung biopsy revealed a diagnosis of nodular sclerosis classic Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL-NS). She was considered to have "other iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproli...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
Abstract The reported number of new cases underestimates the real spread of COVID-19 pandemic because of non-tested asymptomatic people and limited global access to reliable diagnostic tests. In this context, COVID-19 mortality with confirmed diagnosis becomes an attractive source of information to be included in the analysis of perspectives and proposals. Objective data are required to calculate the capacity of resources provided by health systems. New strategies are needed to stabilize or minimize the mortality surge. However, we will not afford this goal until more alternatives were available. We still need an ...
Source: The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Tohoku J Exp Med Source Type: research
We present one of the first successful cases of VV-ECMO support to recovery of COVID-19 respiratory failure in North America.
Source: ASAIO Journal - Category: Medical Devices Tags: Management of COVID-19 Patients Source Type: research
Considering that female sexual hormones may modulate the inflammatory response and also exhibit direct effects on the cells of the immune system, herein, we intend to discuss the sex differences and the role of estradiol in modulating the lung and systemic inflammatory response, focusing on its possible application as a treatment modality for SARS-CoV-2 patients. COVID-19 patients develop severe hypoxemia early in the course of the disease, which is silent most of the time. Small fibrinous thrombi in pulmonary arterioles and a tumefaction of endothelial were observed in the autopsies of fatal COVID-19 cases. Studies showed...
Source: Clinics - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
As more of us wear face masks and rely on eye contact, how will it change the way we relate to each otherA conversation with a girlfriend when I was in Italy a few weeks ago got me thinking about the latest new norm of the post-coronavirus society: enhanced eye contact. She had told me how, standing in the endless queue for the supermarket, wearing her mask, she had caught the eye of a handsome man in another loop of the queue and found herself engaged in a wordless flirtation carried out just with the eyes from a distance. After this, she had taken to piling on extra eyeliner and mascara.“What I am saving in not buy...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Coronavirus outbreak Health & wellbeing Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: The analyses provides a real world approach to the management of acute or chronic cough in various clinical conditions with pro- or antitussive agents while avoiding their misuse in empirical settings. PMID: 32469706 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Respiratory Care - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Respir Med Source Type: research
CORONAVIRUS symptoms include a high fever, a new cough, and loss of smell and taste. But you could also be at risk of COVID-19 infection if you have any of these other warning signs of coronavirus. This is the current complete list of COVID-19 symptoms.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Typhoid fever is the result of a human host-restricted Salmonella enteric serotype typhi infection that causes enteric fever. Around 21 million people contract typhoid annually, with Pakistan's inhabitants at most risk amongst Asian countries where typhoid remains prevalent. Decades of indiscriminate antibiotic usage has driven the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains and more recently, extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of Salmonella enteric serotype typhi. Current reports of extensively drug-resistant typhoid fever outbreak in Pakistan are not only a major concern for Pakistan but also for hea...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
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