Pre-Transplant Weight Loss and Survival after Kidney Transplantation

We examined post-transplant survival among obese kidney candidates who were temporarily designated waitlist inactive (status 7) due to their weight. Methods: Using OPTN/United Network for Organ Sharing data, patient and graft survival of adult status 7 recipients with a registration body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2 (n = 328) were compared to all others (controls; n = 74,066). Status 7 recipients were then matched to controls to assess whether pre-transplant weight loss was associated with a survival benefit. Results: Median BMI at registration (38 vs. 27 kg/m2, p
Source: American Journal of Nephrology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research

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Conclusions: While there is a certain overlap between the results of the current study and published transcriptomic profiles of non-transplanted livers with steatosis, we have identified discrete characteristics of the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in liver grafts potentially utilizable for the establishment of predictive signature. Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in industrialized countries, its prevalence being estimated at 19–31.3% (1). It encompasses a range of conditions that are thought to arise from fatty liver (simple steatosis) throu...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Crohn’s Disease in Clinical Remission Is Marked by Systemic Oxidative Stress Arno R. Bourgonje1, Julius Z. H. von Martels1, Marian L. C. Bulthuis2, Marco van Londen3, Klaas Nico Faber1, Gerard Dijkstra1† and Harry van Goor2*† 1Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands 2Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands 3Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Gro...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
From the Incretin Concept and the Discovery of GLP-1 to Today's Diabetes Therapy Jens Juul Holst* Department of Biomedical Sciences, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Researchers have been looking for insulin-stimulating factors for more than 100 years, and in the 1960ties it was definitively proven that the gastrointestinal tract releases important insulinotropic factors upon oral glucose intake, so-called incretin hormones. The first significant factor identified was the duodenal glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, GIP, wh...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 18 April 2019Source: Journal of Sport and Health ScienceAuthor(s): Xin Luan, Xiangyang Tian, Haixin Zhang, Rui Huang, Na Li, Peijie Chen, Ru WangAbstractA growing understanding of the benefits of exercise over the past few decades has prompted researchers to take an interest in the possibilities of exercise therapy. Because each sport has its own set of characteristics and physiological complications that tend to appear during exercise training, the effects and underlying mechanisms of exercise remain unclear. Thus, the first step in probing exercise effects on different diseases is the s...
Source: Journal of Sport and Health Science - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
Giuseppe Ristagno1*, Francesca Fumagalli1, Barbara Bottazzi2, Alberto Mantovani2,3,4, Davide Olivari1, Deborah Novelli1 and Roberto Latini1 1Department of Cardiovascular Research, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research IRCCS, Milan, Italy 2Humanitas Clinical and Research Center-IRCCS, Milan, Italy 3Humanitas University, Milan, Italy 4The William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom The long pentraxin PTX3 is a member of the pentraxin family produced locally by stromal and myeloid cells in response to proinflammatory signals and microbial moieties. The p...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusion As a critical regulator of inflammation and cell survival, the NFκB pathway is a promising target for diagnosing and treating kidney diseases. For modulation of the NFκB pathway in the clinic, a number of molecules can effectively inhibit NFκB signaling by targeting the receptors, associated adaptors, IKKs, IκBs and transcriptional regulators (144). There is further clinical evidence on small-molecule inhibitors of IKKα and NIK from recent trials on anti-cancer therapies (145). These clinical trials showed that the cancer-selective pharmacodynamic response of DTP3, the co-inhibitor...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated the genetic contribution to renal disease in Tiwi Islanders by conducting a GWAS, in which associations were tested between SNP genetic variants and single measure ACR levels. A number of nominally significantly associated SNPs were identified. These SNPs did not reach genome wide significance, probably due to the small sample size. The top eight SNPs were re-tested for association in a separately collected cohort from the same population. Four of these SNPs were significantly associated with ACR in the replication sample (p
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
A drug that’s used to help control blood sugar in people with diabetes has now been shown to help prevent or slow kidney disease, which causes millions of deaths each year and requires hundreds of thousands of people to use dialysis to stay alive. Doctors say it’s hard to overstate the importance of this study, and what it means for curbing this problem, which is growing because of the obesity epidemic. The study tested Janssen Pharmaceuticals’ drug Invokana. Results were discussed Sunday at a medical meeting in Australia and published by the New England Journal of Medicine. About 30 million Americans and...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized medicine onetime overnight Source Type: news
Conclusion: The obesity-related SNP rs545854 was correlated with the serum uric acid level and risk of hyperuricemia in a male Chinese population. Therefore, men carrying this SNP could benefit from limiting their meat consumption to prevent hyperuricemia. These findings suggest an underlying genetic link between obesity and hyperuricemia worthy of further exploration. Introduction Serum uric acid (SUA) is a final product of the metabolic breakdown of purine oxidation (1). Since humans lack the gene for uricase that converts uric acid into a soluble form, the human uric acid level tends to be higher than that of othe...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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