Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

4 Frustrating Facts About PCOS... and What They Mean for You

Depression. Weight gain. Increased acne and hair growth. Irregular periods. Infertility. These are some of the most notable symptoms of one of the most common hormonal, metabolic and reproductive disorders found in women: polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). So, what is PCOS exactly? Women with PCOS have too many male hormones and not enough female hormones, which interferes with ovulation. With PCOS, the ovaries are typically enlarged and may even contain multiple small cyst-like structures (immature ovarian follicles). If left untreated, this hormone imbalance can affect everything from a woman's menstrual cycle, to her appearance, to her ability to have children, to her overall health. Unfortunately, this disorder is one of the most misunderstood, under-diagnosed and under-funded conditions affecting women's health. It's time to step up and educate ourselves. So here are four frustrating facts about PCOS and what they mean for you: 1. Between five to 10 percent of women of childbearing age in the United States, or roughly 5 million, have PCOS. That percentage makes it one of the most common hormonal endocrine disorders in women. What's more, it also makes it the most common cause of female infertility. According to Sasha Ottey, founder and executive director of PCOS Challenge, Inc., "PCOS is one of the most critical, underserved, under-diagnosed and under-funded conditions affecting women's health. We need the help of media, government agencies and funding sources to...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

Conclusions: We did not find any impact of brain atrophy on the risk of END and the outcome at 3 months in severe ischemic strokes after IV thrombolysis.Eur Neurol 2018;79:240 –246
Source: European Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ReviveMed, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) spinout, is using artificial intelligence (AI) to unlock the power of metabolomics to discover new therapies to treat diseases. Metabolomics is the large-scale study of small molecules like glucose or cholesterol produced by cellular activity. ReviveMed’s platform could help pharmaceutical companies redesign existing drugs or develop new drugs to help patients suffering from disease. The Cambridge, MA-based company recently raised funding to help further develop its AI solution, closing an oversubscribed seed round of $1.5 million. Rivas Capital led the round, ...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Software Source Type: news
Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums
CONCLUSION: The finding of a family risk of developing plurimetabolic syndrome and a diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease indicates that patients with oral clefts may be more prone to developing acquired heart disease. Thus, our findings highlight the importance of anamnesis and methodological triangulation (clinical-electrocardiographic-echocardiographic) in the investigation of patients with oral clefts and emphasize that cardiological follow-up to evaluate acquired and/or rhythm heart diseases is necessary. This strategy permits comorbidity prevention and individualized planned treatment.
Source: Clinics - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
The American physician and writer, Danielle Ofri, tells the story of a near fatal mistake that she made at the beginning of the second year of her residency. A patient was brought to the emergency room in a diabetic coma, and although her initial management was fine, Ofri then made an error and “proceeded to nearly kill…[the] patient”. Recognising her predicament, she called for senior assistance. When an explanation was demanded of her performance, Ofri's words dried up. Humiliation set in as she was questioned in front of her intern: “I could almost feel myself dying away on the spot.
Source: LANCET - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research
Joanne Reekie and colleagues1 did a population-based cohort study on the association between a positive test for chlamydia and spontaneous preterm birth, having a baby who is small for gestational age, or stillbirth. On the basis of the findings from their study, the authors concluded that a genital chlamydia infection —presumably treated either before or during pregnancy, regardless of the trimester during which testing occurred—does not substantially increase a woman's risk of having one of these three adverse pregnancy outcomes.
Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
Conclusions: Maternal influenza immunization may reduce severe pneumonia episodes among infants—particularly those too young to be completely vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza.
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Erratum Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: ESPID Reports and Reviews Source Type: research
Conclusion: Paricalcitol and D/P creatinine were independently related to PPL. Paricalcitol may have an effect on PPL in PD patientsBlood Purif 2018;46:103 –110
Source: Blood Purification - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
More News: Acne | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cardiology | Children | Clomid | Depression | Diabetes | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Education | Endocrinology | Endometrial Cancer | Funding | Genetics | Government | Health | Heart | Heart Attack | Heart Transplant | Hormones | Infertility | Information Technology | Men | Nutrition | Obesity | OBGYN | Ovarian Cancer | Ovaries | Polycystic Ovary Syndrome | Pregnancy | Reproduction Medicine | Sports Medicine | Study | Training | Universities & Medical Training | Vitamins | Websites | Women