Chemical exposures and demographic associations in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: a large single institution physician validated cohort study

AbstractCutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are a rare group of T-cell neoplasms which infiltrate the skin and can result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for CTCL are still poorly understood though recent studies suggest chemical exposures may play a role in its development. To further characterize patient-centered risk factors for CTCL, especially compared with matched controls, we performed one of the largest prospective cohort survey studies to date to examine patient-reported exposures and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in association with concurrent clinical disease characteristics. Patient demographics, lifestyle factors, and chemical exposures were collected via clinical data and surveys. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Chi-square tests andt tests were utilized to compare patient-reported exposures and HRQoL in patients with CTCL versus matched healthy controls (HC). Statistically significant differences were identified between patients and HC in terms of race (non-white race 22.4% in CTCL patients vs. 18.8% in HC,P = 0.01), and education level (high school or less 41.6% in CTCL patients vs. 14.3% in HC,P = 0.001), but not with Fitzpatrick skin type (P = 0.11) or smoking status (P = 0.28). Notably, 36.0% of the CTCL patients reported exposures to chemicals, a near threefold increased percentage when compared to HC (12.9%). Among various chemical exposures, 27.0% of the CTCL patients specifically reported industrial chemical exp...
Source: Archives of Dermatological Research - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research