GERD: High-Risk Patients Get Endoscopic Short ShriftGERD: High-Risk Patients Get Endoscopic Short Shrift

Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who are at highest risk for Barrett esophagus or cancer are less likely to undergo diagnostic endoscopy. Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

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Conclusions RYGB patients are still at risk of developing esophageal cancer. Patients at risk should be screened prior to RYGB and those with Barret’s esophagus need to undergo rigorous endoscopic surveillance following surgery. If detected early, EMR and ESD are invaluable in managing those who progress. [...] © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New YorkArticle in Thieme eJournals: Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text
Source: Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Innovations and brief communications Source Type: research
Esophagologists and foregut surgeons have long debated the merits (or lack thereof) of antireflux surgery for GERD. Surgeons argue that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) do not stop reflux, often require dose escalation, and have done little to decrease the frequency of Barrett ’s esophagus and are in part responsible for the rise in esophageal cancer.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
Several studies reported an increase in lung and laryngeal cancers in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The underlying mechanism is thought to be damage to the respiratory epithelium by gastric refluxate causing lung injury, chronic inflammation, and cancer promotion by activating proliferative signal pathways. Barrett ’s Esophagus (BE) is a manifestation of severe GERD. So, we wanted to examine the prevalence of respiratory cancers in BE patients and evaluate any predisposing factors.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Poster abstracts Source Type: research
Conclusions: A novel modified EG, the SPADE operation, has the potential to decrease gastroesophageal reflux following a PG. PMID: 32269846 [PubMed]
Source: Journal of Gastric Cancer - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: J Gastric Cancer Source Type: research
The landscape of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) management is changing, in a good way. Several key forces have converged (Box  1), propelling us to see GERD with a new perspective. One of these forces is the expanding role of the interventional gastrointestinal endoscopist in foregut diseases, including GERD, Barrett’s and early esophageal cancer, achalasia, Zenker diverticulum, early gastric cancer, gastric outlet obst ruction, and obesity. Accordingly, when tapped by Dr Lightdale to be the editor of this issue devoted to GERD management, I had the privilege of assembling some of the top GERD authoritie...
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Preface Source Type: research
Endoscopy DOI: 10.1055/a-1104-5245In Europe at present, but also in 2040, 1 in 3 cancer-related deaths are expected to be caused by digestive cancers. Endoscopic technologies enable diagnosis, with relatively low invasiveness, of precancerous conditions and early cancers, thereby improving patient survival. Overall, endoscopy capacity must be adjusted to facilitate both effective screening programs and rigorous control of the quality assurance and surveillance systems required. 1 For average-risk populations, ESGE recommends the implementation of organized population-based screening programs for colorectal cancer, based...
Source: Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Position Statement Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 6 October 2019Source: Cirugía Española (English Edition)Author(s): Félix Junquera, Sonia Fernández-Ananín, Carmen BalaguéAbstractEarly-stage (T1) esophagogastric junction cancer continues to represent 2%–3% of all cases. Adenocarcinoma is the most frequent and important type, the main risk factors for which are gastroesophageal reflux and Barrett's esophagus with dysplasia.Patients with mucosal (T1a) or submucosal (T1b) involvement initially require a thorough digestive endoscopy, and narrow-band imaging can improve visualization. Endoscopic...
Source: Cirugia Espanola - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Gluten? Lactose? Stomach pain? Digestive troubles? Way too many people suffer from gastrointestinal issues, and much less are aware of the digital technologies that can come to their aid. Did you know that digestibles could successfully replace the dreaded colonoscopy? Or have you heard about microbiome testing? What about the swarm of health apps supporting dietary restrictions? We took a deep breath and jumped into the universe of digital technologies just to bring you as much information about the future of gastroenterology as possible. Will you jump after us? IBS, colorectal cancer, and other animals Referring to...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Genomics Health Sensors & Trackers diet dieting digestibles digestion digital health gastro gastroenterologist gastroenterology gastrointestinal gluten gut Innovation lactose microbiome stomach techno Source Type: blogs
Endoscopic screening for Barrett esophagus (BE) is currently recommended for men with chronic (>5 years) and/or frequent (weekly or more) symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) with two or more additional risk factors (age>50, Caucasian, central obesity, smoking, confirmed family history). We hypothesized that individuals with EAC (cases) would be more likely to have frequent symptoms during early to mid-adulthood (age 18 to 50) compared to population controls. Our study aimed to determine whether cases were more likely to experience GERD symptoms through age 50 than individuals without EAC (population controls) ...
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Monday abstract Source Type: research
Balagué C Abstract Early-stage (T1) esophagogastric junction cancer continues to represent 2-3% of all cases. Adenocarcinoma is the most frequent and important type, the main risk factors for which are gastroesophageal reflux and Barrett's esophagus with dysplasia. Patients with mucosal (T1a) or submucosal (T1b) involvement initially require a thorough digestive endoscopy, and narrow-band imaging can improve visualization. Endoscopic treatment of these lesions includes endoscopic mucosal resection, radiofrequency ablation and endoscopic submucosal dissection. Accurate staging is necessary in order to provi...
Source: Cirugia eEspanola - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Cir Esp Source Type: research
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