Body of Proof Star Dana Delany Uses Incorrect CPR Technique and Protocol

In the opening scenes in the last episode of Body of Proof, a television series starring Dana Delany as medical examiner Dr. Megan Hunt, a patient was given CPR after being shot in the back. While the writers of Body of Proof, no doubt, will claim dramatic license in the depiction of the scene to further the episode’s story line, the technique and protocol used by Dr. Hunt does not fit with the standard diagnosis and treatment steps as described in the 2010 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and practiced in real-life resuscitations by trauma surgeons, intensive care physicians, emergency medicine physicians, and prehospital educators. In the scene, Dr. Hunt examines a shooting victim and realizes through undescribed clinical clues that the patient is still alive. She then turns the patient over onto his back, calls for 5 ml of epineprhine, does 2-3 chest compressions with her hands positioned over his left mid-rib cage, gives 2-3 breaths via mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, and then injects in a perpendicular direction 5 ml of epinephrine via a large syringe and needle into the anterior left chest cavity. Following ACLS protocol and the standard CPR field protocol taught to and practiced by prehospital personnel, some highlights of  real-life practice and how this differs from the television scene are described below: When a patient is found unresponsive, the ABC protocol is started after a single bystander has called for help. In this scene, Dr. Hunt was ...
Source: Inside Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Musings Body of Proof CPR Dana Delany Megan Hunt protocol Source Type: blogs

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Source: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: Biomedical Safety and Standards - Category: Medical Devices Tags: RECALLS & FIELD CORRECTIONS—CLASS II Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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Source: American Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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Source: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
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 DOI: 10.3779/j.issn.1009-3419.2020.01.08
Source: Chinese Journal of Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
This study had afatal flaw: they did not keep track of all the Non-STEMI patients who were NOT enrolled, but instead were sent for immediate angiogram.  It was done in Europe, where the guidelines suggest taking all shockable arrests emergently to the cath lab.  So it is highly likely that physicians were very reluctant to enroll patients; they did not want them to be randomized to no angiogram.  This strong suspicion is supported by their data:only 22 of 437 (5.0%) patients in this study had OMI. What percent of shockable arrests without STE have an OMI?  This large registry in Circ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology : PACE - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY Source Type: research
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Source: Europace - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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