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Africa: When the Heart Still Sings - Can Music Unlock Communication With Dementia Patients?

[Daily Maverick] There's no coming back from dementia. But increasingly, music therapy is being used to decrease the isolation experienced by these patients. Emotionally, it's a strong trigger. And neurologically, it taps into parts of the brain that can still be accessed. By MARELISE VAN DER MERWE.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news

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Music can help reduce symptoms but only 5% of care homes are using it effectively, finds reportThe symptoms of hundreds of thousands of vulnerable people with dementia could significantly improve by listening to and playing music, according to a report.The study, which compiled existing evidence as well as talking to experts, found music can help people with dementia recall information and reduce symptoms such as anxiety, agitation and aggression.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Dementia Mental health Social care Health policy Society Politics Public services policy UK news Source Type: news
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an 8-week nursing intervention consisting of 2 weekly sessions of music and reminiscence therapy together with the application of reality orientation techniques. Our expectation at the onset of the study was that listening to music that was familiar and connected with the memory of past events would, due to the music's emotional impact, stimulate memory associations, leading, in turn, to a positive effect on depression and anxiety in people living with dementia. We carried out a pre-/posttest intervention design with a sample of 19 patients divided into 2 groups&md...
Source: Holistic Nursing Practice - Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research
Nonpharmacologic interventions have been shown to be relatively effective in reducing agitation and improving the quality of life of patients with dementia.1,2 Programs/interventions that have been employed in many long-term care facilities include aromatherapy,3 art therapy,2 exercise therapy,4 –6 music therapy,2 pet therapy, and more.1 Exercise programs in particular have been shown in some studies to be effective in reducing agitation among patients with dementia.4,6,7 One emerging intervention that is not well established or validated, however, is snoezelen therapy.
Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
In the last paragraph of their Perspective,1 Drs. Gerdner and Buckwalter misquote my previously published commentary,2 using their erroneous quotation to support their contention that I ignored their substantial contributions to the published literature. My actual statement attempted to convey the significance of such efforts: “…there is great need for evidence-based nonpharmacologic interventions to improve behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia…”. I went on to cite three review papers describing empirical support for the use of music therapy in persons with dementia; these reviews eit...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research
In the last paragraph of their Perspective,1 Drs. Gerdner and Buckwalter misquote my previously published commentary,2 using their erroneous quotation to support their contention that I ignored their substantial contributions to the published literature. My actual statement attempted to convey the significance of such efforts: “there is great need for evidence-based nonpharmacologic interventions to improve behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia…”. I went on to cite three review papers describing empirical support for the use of music therapy in persons with dementia; these reviews either directly cite Dr .
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research
ConclusionsAlthough there remains a paucity of high‐quality research in this area, the existing evidence indicates that behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia require a range of non‐pharmacologic sensory‐focused approaches that are tailored to the individual. Further research is needed to determine the interventions best suited for specific behaviours and contexts, particularly inappropriate sexual behaviours. Relevance to clinical practiceThere is a need for nurses to be informed of best practices in order to effectively plan appropriate interventions to address behaviours in older adults with dementia. ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Abstract Both music therapy and reminiscence therapy are currently being used to increase aspects of wellbeing in older people, including those with memory diseases such as dementia, as alternatives to pharmacological treatments. There is growing evidence that combining these therapies in a focused way would provide unique wellbeing outcomes for this population. This review aims to report on the existing intervention studies that utilize both music and reminiscence activities in equal measure in elderly adult populations. A systematic review of intervention-based studies published between 1996 and 2016 was carried...
Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Clin Pract Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Because of an improved evidence base, the latest version of the German S3 guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of dementia places greater emphasis on non-pharmacological treatments for behavioral disorders in dementia than it did in the past. The global efficacy of such treatments against behavioral disorders is well documented. Nonetheless, because of the heterogeneity of interventions and varying standards of assessment, the evidence for the utility of certain specific methods in the treatment of specific behavioral disorders is still limited. More research is needed in this area. PMID: 28705297 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Deutsches Arzteblatt International - Category: General Medicine Tags: Dtsch Arztebl Int Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Despite the limited evidence of the present review, it is important to continue supporting MT as a complementary treatment for older adults with dementia. RCTs with larger sample sizes are needed to better elucidate the impact of MT on cognitive functions. PMID: 28691506 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Aging and Mental Health - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Aging Ment Health Source Type: research
Language UndefinedPurpose: To learn about the possible benefits of movement and music therapy in older adults with dementia.
Source: Alzheimers Clinical Trials - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: clinical trials
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