Africa: When the Heart Still Sings - Can Music Unlock Communication With Dementia Patients?

[Daily Maverick] There's no coming back from dementia. But increasingly, music therapy is being used to decrease the isolation experienced by these patients. Emotionally, it's a strong trigger. And neurologically, it taps into parts of the brain that can still be accessed. By MARELISE VAN DER MERWE.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news

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“Music is therapy. Music moves people. It connects people in ways that no other medium can. It pulls heart strings. It acts as medicine.” — Macklemore Much research over the years has centered on the potential, perceived and realized benefits of music. In fact, the area of study has blossomed, growing from the preliminary findings of earlier studies to recent ones that built upon them. What’s exciting is the widespread and diverse benefits that music offers to everyone, young, old and in-between. Musical training gives babies’ brains a boost. Even before babies can walk or talk, they can benef...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Creativity Happiness Health-related Motivation and Inspiration Research Self-Esteem Stress Coping Emotional Support Music Therapy musical therapy Source Type: blogs
MONDAY, April 30, 2018 -- Music therapy might help ease the anxiety and agitation that plagues many Alzheimer's patients, researchers suggest. " People with dementia are confronted by a world that is unfamiliar to them, which causes disorientation...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 23 March 2018 Source:The Arts in Psychotherapy Author(s): Steven Lyons, Vicky Karkou, Brenda Roe, Bonnie Meekums, Michael Richards In England, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines for supporting people with dementia recommend the therapeutic use of dancing and/or music as a treatment for non-cognitive symptoms, but make no direct reference to dance movement therapy or music therapy. Also, previous Cochrane Reviews in these areas have been criticized for being limited to randomized controlled trials focusing on outcomes. In order to maximize findings and...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
If you regularly turn to music intuitively to relieve stress, you certainly aren’t alone. You can definitely tap into the power of music to bring healing to yourself. Read along to discover the hidden psychological benefits of music that will make you feel better in times of stress. If you are not a music lover, the treasure trove of hidden benefits below just might convert you to begin singing a new tune as your go-to stress reliever. Music can help relieve stress. In one 2013 study, participants took part in one of three conditions before being exposed to a stressor, and subsequently took a psychosocial stress t...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Creativity Memory and Perception Research Self-Help Stress Music Self Care stress management stress reduction Source Type: blogs
Hospice organizations are keenly aware of the soothing power of music. Sometimes the music may be used casually, by the facility or the family, knowing that this is a type of music that the person who is in the dying process had always enjoyed. Increasingly, though, employing trained music therapists has been favored. This type of therapy seems especially helpful with those who are dying from Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. Perhaps this is because, in the final stage of dementia, people have usually moved beyond the point where conversation is possible. Read full article on HealthCentral about how music t...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Music therapy is demonstrated to be effective to relieve the agitation among people with dementia, but the comparative effectiveness of methods of music engagement for people with dementia is uncertain.
Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Music can help reduce symptoms but only 5% of care homes are using it effectively, finds reportThe symptoms of hundreds of thousands of vulnerable people with dementia could significantly improve by listening to and playing music, according to a report.The study, which compiled existing evidence as well as talking to experts, found music can help people with dementia recall information and reduce symptoms such as anxiety, agitation and aggression.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Dementia Mental health Social care Health policy Society Politics Public services policy UK news Source Type: news
Discussion and Implications: Nonpharmacological practices are person-centered, and their selection can be informed by considering the cause and meaning of the individual's behavioral and psychological symptoms. Family caregivers and paid care providers can implement evidence-based practices in home or residential care settings, although some practices require the development of more specific protocols if they are to become widely used in an efficacious manner. PMID: 29361069 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The Gerontologist - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Gerontologist Source Type: research
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an 8-week nursing intervention consisting of 2 weekly sessions of music and reminiscence therapy together with the application of reality orientation techniques. Our expectation at the onset of the study was that listening to music that was familiar and connected with the memory of past events would, due to the music's emotional impact, stimulate memory associations, leading, in turn, to a positive effect on depression and anxiety in people living with dementia. We carried out a pre-/posttest intervention design with a sample of 19 patients divided into 2 groups&md...
Source: Holistic Nursing Practice - Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research
Nonpharmacologic interventions have been shown to be relatively effective in reducing agitation and improving the quality of life of patients with dementia.1,2 Programs/interventions that have been employed in many long-term care facilities include aromatherapy,3 art therapy,2 exercise therapy,4 –6 music therapy,2 pet therapy, and more.1 Exercise programs in particular have been shown in some studies to be effective in reducing agitation among patients with dementia.4,6,7 One emerging intervention that is not well established or validated, however, is snoezelen therapy.
Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
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